Palace of the Dukes of Lorraine

Nancy, France

The Ducal Palace of Nancy was built in the 15th century for René II, Duke of Lorraine. In the 18th century the palace was extended by Baroque architects. Under the rule of Leopold, Duke of Lorraine parts of the building were pulled down, in preparation of greater projects, he intended. After the House of Habsburg had ceded Lorraine to French control in exchange for Tuscany, the ducal palace in Nancy became the home of Stanislaw Leszczynski. After Stanislaw's death, his Duchy was inherited by his son-in-law, King Louis XV of France and incorporated in his dominions.

The palace used to have St George's Collegiate Church, which was the house chapel and also the burial place of members of the house of Lorraine. The chapel does not exist anymore. The functions of the house chapel was then given to the Church of Saint-François-des-Cordeliers, which is located next to the palace.

The first level of the structure contains reception and dining rooms used by the Dukes, known as the Galerie des Cerfs. On the ground floor, there is an open-vaulted gallery overlooking the garden, while a portal marks the Grande Rue entrance. Also built in Gothic style, its décor suggests that it is one of the earliest examples of work from the Renaissance period in nowaday's eastern France.

In 1848 the palace was converted to house the Musée Lorrain. The museum's collections include artefacts from the Gallo-Roman and Merovingian civilisations of the east of France, religious and funeral sculptures and stained-glass windows from the Medieval period, as well as armaments from the 14th and 15th centuries. The museum also includes a collection of Renaissance art including works by Ligier Richier and sculptures relating to the history of the Palace itself, as well as of major works by Georges de La Tour and Jacques Callot, and a rare collection of Jewish ritual objects.

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Address

Grande Rue 64, Nancy, France
See all sites in Nancy

Details

Founded: 1502
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tilo Ebinghaus (39 days ago)
Lots of historic artifacts (statues and paintings) that are worthwhile discovering
Sebastian S. (3 months ago)
For the sake of god, please put out signs that show interested tourists that the museum is closed. And please adjust the opening hours here. It's a disgrace for any museum to let potential visitors not know that you are closed. I'm really disappointed.
Antoine M (9 months ago)
This is also known as the Palace of the Dukes of Lorraine which is now the Museum of Lorraine. When I visited it was closed for major renovation until 2023! The only other part of this museum opens is the Church of the Cordeliers which is a tombs church, the burial site for the Lorraine family. It has collections of art history with an archeological collection in one of the buildings in the back of the courtyard. Pity that it was closed but the outside fa├žades gave a glimpse of the stupendously magnificent architecture that was once the Dukes Palace of Lorraine.
KAY SAFONOV (2 years ago)
The museum is closed until 2023 for renovations.
Nicole Johnston (2 years ago)
This museum is now closed until 2023 for a major renovation project.
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