Museums of Metz

Metz, France

The Museums of Metz were founded in 1839. They are also known as the Golden Courtyard Museums, in reference to the palace of Austrasia's kings in Metz, whose buildings they occupy. The collections in this museum(s) are distributed through a 3,500 m² labyrinthal organization of rooms, incorporating the ancient Petites Carmes Abbey, the Chèvremont granary, and the Trinitaires church. The institution is organized into four broad sections: the history and archeological museum, the medieval department, the museum of architecture and the museum of fine arts. The archeological museum contains rich collections of Gallo-Roman finds — extension works to the museums in the 1930s revealed the vestiges of Gallo-Roman baths.

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Details

Founded: 1839
Category: Museums in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joyce Poelstra (10 months ago)
Great museum! We were quite surprised it's always free entrance. But it's definitely worth your time
A G (10 months ago)
This museum is the last place you want to go if you are disabled, have mobility issues or are just not an Olympic marathoner. God forbid if you have young children as you're not allowed a stroller either. We got lost in the one-way maze that spanned FOUR floors with NO lift in sight and very few places to sit and relax and admire the exhibits. Poorly laid out, poorly presented and an absolute nightmare to get through for a bunch of faded old stones. Give it a miss. If you want to visit Roman ruins or Gothic artifacts, you're better off somewhere else. Pretty derivative exhibits, nothing special when compared to the greater museums in the rest of France and beyond.
Banker (2 years ago)
If you like stones and stuff then its for you. A hour walk to see everything. PS: There are some skeletons if you want to see
Banker (2 years ago)
If you like stones and stuff then its for you. A hour walk to see everything. PS: There are some skeletons if you want to see
Asiwaju Samuel (2 years ago)
It's a welcoming environment
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