Museums of Metz

Metz, France

The Museums of Metz were founded in 1839. They are also known as the Golden Courtyard Museums, in reference to the palace of Austrasia's kings in Metz, whose buildings they occupy. The collections in this museum(s) are distributed through a 3,500 m² labyrinthal organization of rooms, incorporating the ancient Petites Carmes Abbey, the Chèvremont granary, and the Trinitaires church. The institution is organized into four broad sections: the history and archeological museum, the medieval department, the museum of architecture and the museum of fine arts. The archeological museum contains rich collections of Gallo-Roman finds — extension works to the museums in the 1930s revealed the vestiges of Gallo-Roman baths.

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Details

Founded: 1839
Category: Museums in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Banker (11 months ago)
If you like stones and stuff then its for you. A hour walk to see everything. PS: There are some skeletons if you want to see
Asiwaju Samuel (12 months ago)
It's a welcoming environment
gr b (12 months ago)
It was amazing. Super nice people, a lot of interesting and well compressed history, especially about Roman culture in Metz.
Georges Chahine (13 months ago)
Big and well preserved artifacts
Avram Sanders (2 years ago)
This is a really cool museum. Theres lots of information and cool artifacts from both Roman and Medieval times. Make sure to save quite a big chunk of time for this museum because there's a lot to see. The layout is designed well although it can be hard to follow if you don't pay close attention to the map that's given to you. Most of the information is given in French, English, and German, however at one point they kind of just stop giving the latter two and everything goes back to french.
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