St. Epvre Basilica

Nancy, France

Built in the 19th century in gothic revival style by Prosper Morey, Saint-Epvre’s Basilica is decorated with stained glass and wood panelling and was in-part made in Bavaria. It was richly endowed by Napoleon III, Emperor Franz-Joseph, Ludwig II of Bavaria and Pope Pius who donated the beautiful stone paving in the choir that came from the Appian Way.

The market square and general trading centre in the Middle Ages, the fountain in the middle has a statue of Duke René II of Lorraine, who defeated Charles the bold, Duke of Burgundy, at the Battle of Nancy in 1477.

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Details

Founded: 1864-1874
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.nancy-tourisme.fr

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Xander BW (2 years ago)
Great spot.
Antoine M (2 years ago)
Absolutely magnificent Gothic style architecture! Most impressive is how the spires looking in proportion to its length from the outside. The stupendously magnificent staircase in the front entrance is spectacular and apparently a gift from Franz Joseph the first of Austria. The canopies, seventy four of them, illuminate the Basilica with tremendously beautiful rosette windows, a gorgeous nave with paintings on canvas and mosaics, are just a fraction of the beauty of this magnificent Basilica. The neo Gothic organ in a grandstand is breathtaking and apparently was awarded the gold medal at the Universal Exhibition in Paris in 1867! It's a classified French historic monument and deservedly so for it possesses some of the most finest details that only a stupendous gothic cathedral I've visited. Welcoming and suitable for all ages and backgrounds.
Alan Murray (3 years ago)
Never seen a church with so many stained glass windows beautiful
Yur Steenbergen (3 years ago)
Beautiful acoustics even greater windows
Mattaniah lioness (3 years ago)
Visit it if you are around town!
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