Hermesvilla is a palace and a former hunting area for the Habsburg nobility. Emperor Franz Joseph decided to build the Villa Hermés in the summer of 1881. Ostensibly, the Emperor hoped it would encourage his wife, who traveled widely, to remain in Vienna. It was designed by architect Karl Freiherr von Hasenauer, and construction lasted 1882 until 1886. The Empress herself commissioned the sculptor Ernst Herter from Berlin to create the sculpture, titled Hermés der Wächter and instructed that it was to be placed in the garden of the villa.

In 1886, the villa, and all surrounding buildings, including riding facilities and stables for the horses of Empress Elisabeth, were finished. From 1887 until her assassination in 1898, the imperial couple regularly spent time there every year in late spring, varying from a few days to a couple of weeks.

The street leading to the Villa was one of the first streets in Vienna with electric lighting, and the Villa was one of the first buildings in Vienna with a telephone connection.

During the post-WWII Russian occupation of Vienna from 1945-1955, the Villa was looted by the Soviets, became run down and remained in poor condition for a number of years. However, in 1963, the Disney movie 'Miracle of the White Stallions' brought back the interest in the building. This led to a private initiative that motivated the Austrian authorities to renovate the Villa, and the renovation process lasted from 1968 until 1974.

The stables, originally built for the horses of the Empress, are located in the left wing of the courtyard. The original stable equipment, including the wall partitions for the box stalls and tie stalls, still exist today to a large extent.

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Address

Hermesstraße, Vienna, Austria
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Details

Founded: 1882-1886
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Austria

Rating

3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yaroslav Kurennoy (13 months ago)
Awesome place. The food was perfect. Good choice for vegetarians.
Timo Lukkarinen (13 months ago)
Today it’s 27 degrees warm, the people at this cafe is refusing to sell bottled water if you don’t pay by cash, where the minimum charge is 10 EUR by card. They told us to walk another five kilometers to another place. The attitude was worse than rude, stay away from this horrible place!!
Tammi Tantani (14 months ago)
Bad service attitude, unfriendly to foreigners.
Denis Ute (17 months ago)
Very nice and cosy restaurant, which is hidden in the park. Food was absolutely delicious, but we needed to wait for waitresses for a while.
Iulia Stingu (21 months ago)
Desgin is nice but you have to go through the kitchen to get in the salon. Food is good but overpriced
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