Royal Villa of Monza

Monza, Italy

The Royal Villa (Villa Reale) lies on the banks of the Lambro, surrounded by the large Monza Park, one of the largest enclosed parks in Europe. It was originally built by Giuseppe Piermarini between 1777 and 1780, when Lombardy was part of Austrian Empire, for the Archduke Ferdinand of Austria.

Following the establishment of the Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy, the building was used as a Royal Palace and became home to the Viceroy of Italy, Eugène de Beauharnais. With the fall of the First Empire (1815), Austria annexed the Italian territories to the Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia, Monza being included in the province of Milan.

In 1861, when the new Kingdom of Italy was established, the building became a palace of the Italian Royal Family of Savoia. The Royal Villa was abandoned by the royal family in 1900, after the murder of King Humbert I near the entrance as he returned from an event.

The palace complex includes the Royal Chapel, the Cavallerizza (horse-shed), the Rotonda dell'Appiani, the Teatrino di Corte ('Small Court Theatre') and the Orangerie. The rooms at the first floor include grand salons and halls, and the Royal apartments of King Humbert I of Italy and of Queen Margherita of Savoy. In front of the palace are the Royal gardens, designed by Piermarini as English landscape gardens.

In the first floorthere are the reception roomsand the apartments of King Umberto I and Queen Margherita.The front of villa facing east opens to English Gardens designed by Piermarini.

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Details

Founded: 1777-1780
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

J C (3 years ago)
Beautiful historical Palace with a huge garden. Visited there in 2015 while on vacation in Monza. Lots of artwork to enjoy throughout the property. Great place to visit with family and friends and enjoy a glass of wine or lunch.
Quỳnh Nguyễn (3 years ago)
Historical place from 17th century. Very beautiful!! Near Milan , very easy to reach by train.
Nabiel Ekhraimia (3 years ago)
It's my favorite place , whenever I feel stressed I go there for walk. The place is fantastic , the building is fascinating to me , I've been into it once and I did enjoy it. I strongly recommend it for everyone who enjoys the natural beauty and the historical buildings.
Людмила Позняк (3 years ago)
Very good and attractive place for tourist. you need to check working days and time before visit. Guide tell the intresting stories about family. Audio guide is free of charge and there is in Russian
Canavese 67 (3 years ago)
I dedicated only a short time to this beautiful place, unfortunately, however, the impression was good especially for the park that extends to the F1 circuit. to visit with more calm.
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