Gallerie di Piazza Scala

Milan, Italy

The Gallerie di Piazza Scala is a modern and contemporary museum in Milan. Located in Piazza della Scala in the Palazzo Brentani and the Palazzo Anguissola, it hosts 195 artworks from the collections of Fondazione Cariplo with a strong representation of nineteenth century Lombard painters and sculptors, including Antonio Canova and Umberto Boccioni. A new section was opened in the Palazzo della Banca Commerciale Italiana in 2012 with 189 art works from the twentieth century.

The Palazzo Anguissola construction began in 1778, and its Neoclassical facade, designed by Luigi Canonica, was added in 1829 (as well as the facade of adjacent Palazzo Brentani).

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Details

Founded: 2011
Category: Museums in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marlene Manto (9 months ago)
Lovely place to wander if you enjoy art. They have both modern and traditional paintings and artworks. Not free but worth the cost.
Yk (9 months ago)
Not that much works. Not crowded. Have a big cafe restaurant. Not that kind. Some nice works.
Giulio Botto (12 months ago)
Great art gallery with good explanatory panels and interdisciplinary cues for the more curious.
way fairer (2 years ago)
Splendid. One of the best lounge area I have visited because of the black marble columns and liberty style glass ceiling. In addition you can visit permanent exhibition of '800 paintings not too famous but very very interesting for connoisseurs.
Francina Thomas (2 years ago)
Gateway to shopping heaven, with every high end store you can think of. The decor is beautiful, and the high end shopping is second to none. The Galleria is a nice size and you could definitely spend a half to whole day visiting- as there are popular attractions , restaurants, taxi and bus stops,and souvenir stores .It is a very busy place with lots of tourists and locals. A fun day of shopping and sightseeing.
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