La Scala (official name Teatro alla Scala) in Milan is one of the most famous opera houses in the world. The theatre was inaugurated on 3 August 1778. Most of Italy's greatest operatic artists, and many of the finest singers from around the world, have appeared at La Scala. The theatre is regarded as one of the leading opera and ballet theatres in the world and is home to the La Scala Theatre Chorus, La Scala Theatre Ballet and La Scala Theatre Orchestra. The theatre also has an associate school, known as the La Scala Theatre Academy, which offers professional training in music, dance, stage craft and stage management.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1778
Category:

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pepper Poppins (3 months ago)
The staffs are extremely nice and speak English well. They instructed me about the structure of the theatre. I was lucky enough to see Teatro alla Scala with lights on. Everyone who visits Milan should see this. All you need is to book a ticket to the museum and you will also see a little bit of the theatre. Really worth the time!
leo Lee (5 months ago)
This theater tells us why it is one of the world's top three opera houses. In fact, I watched an opera on my honeymoon and made unforgettable memories. With my lovely wife. It is a place where you can listen to the music and songs of the best luxury goods in Milan. If I go to Milan again, I will go to see opera here, not Italy's finest. With my beloved family.
Dalia Kramer (6 months ago)
Absolutely beautiful. Even more beautiful if you get to visit while watching a performance. A tour through the space is amazing to fully get the whole design of the space in
Someone S (10 months ago)
Very beautiful. I attended a German opera with beautiful setting and great cast. They also have screens on which you can follow the play, in my case it was in German and Italian.
Popescu Viorel Ovidiu (11 months ago)
Definitely a must visit place. It has a museum where you can see the clothes that the actors wore in the famous plays. When o went to visit there was a rehearsal going on and i watched it from upstairs.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Abbey of Saint-Étienne

The Abbey of Saint-Etienne, also known as Abbaye aux Hommes ('Men"s Abbey'), is a former monastery dedicated to Saint Stephen (Saint Étienne). It is considered, along with the neighbouring Abbaye aux Dames ('Ladies" Abbey'), to be one of the most notable Romanesque buildings in Normandy. Like all the major abbeys in Normandy, it was Benedictine.

Lanfranc, before being an Archbishop of Canterbury, was abbot of Saint-Etienne. Built in Caen stone during the 11th century, the two semi-completed churches stood for many decades in competition. An important feature added to both churches in about 1120 was the ribbed vault, used for the first time in France. The two abbey churches are considered forerunners of the Gothic architecture. The original Romanesque apse was replaced in 1166 by an early Gothic chevet, complete with rosette windows and flying buttresses. Nine towers and spires were added in the 13th century. The interior vaulting shows a similar progression, beginning with early sexpartite vaulting (using circular ribs) in the nave and progressing to quadipartite vaults (using pointed ribs) in the sanctuary.

The two monasteries were finally donated by William the Conqueror and his wife, Matilda of Flanders, as penalty for their marriage against the Pope"s ruling. William was buried here; Matilda was buried in the Abbaye aux Dames. Unfortunately William"s original tombstone of black marble, the same kind as Matilda"s in the Abbaye aux Dames, was destroyed by the Calvinist iconoclasts in the 16th century and his bones scattered.

As a consequence of the Wars of Religion, the high lantern tower in the middle of the church collapsed and was never rebuilt. The Benedictine abbey was suppressed during the French Revolution and the abbey church became a parish church. From 1804 to 1961, the abbey buildings accommodated a prestigious high school, the Lycée Malherbe. During the Normandy Landings in 1944, inhabitants of Caen found refuge in the church; on the rooftop there was a red cross, made with blood on a sheet, to show that it was a hospital (to avoid bombings).