Royal Palace of Milan

Milan, Italy

The Royal Palace of Milan (Palazzo Reale di Milano) was the seat of government of the city for centuries. Today it serves as a cultural centre and home to expositions and exhibitions.

Originally designed with a structure of two courtyards, the palace was then partially demolished to make room for the Duomo. The palace is located to the right of the facade of the cathedral opposite the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II. The facade of the building follows the style of the ancient courtyard, forming a recess in respect to Piazza del Duomo, known as the Piazzetta Reale.

The magnificent Hall of Caryatids can be found on the main floor of the building. It occupies the site of the old theatre, which burned down in 1776 and is the only room that survived the heavy bombings of 1943. The damage caused by the incendiary and violent air movement was followed by a state of abandonment for over two years, which contributed to further serious damage to the building. Many of the neoclassical interiors of the Palace were lost.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Angela Taylor (2 years ago)
There are always great art shows here and it's a beautiful palace.
Saro C (2 years ago)
A fantastic place full of Art exhibitions and with a nice coffee bar Giacomo
Graham Rogers (2 years ago)
The city was full of art, a little confusing to find in some cases, but once accessed you were not disappointed. I saw Picasso's through the ages, a metamorphosis. It was wonderful.
Evandro C. Santos (2 years ago)
Wonderful palace in a very appealing setting. Worth a visit.
Nikolas Kar (3 years ago)
Picasso's exhibition was great! it was greatly planned with respect to Greek mythology as lived by the renowned Picasso. Quite unique example of a successful combination between sculpture, painting and text. Great job!
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