Starhemberg Castle

Dreistetten, Austria

The first small Starhemberg castle was built by Ottokar III, Margrave of Styria between 1140 and 1145. At the time, the Piesting river was the border between Styria and the March of Austria. In 1192, Styria—and, thus, the castle—was acquired by the Babenbergs. The last Babenberger duke of Austria, Frederick II the Warlike, expanded and fortified the castle, leaving Starhemberg as one of the most important castles in Lower Austria in the 13th century. In wartime, the archives and the family treasure was hidden here, and were guarded by the Teutonic Knights.

After the Battle on the Marchfeld in 1278, the castle was acquired by the Habsburgs. In 1482, the castle was captured by Matthias Corvinus, king of Hungary. In 1683, the castle offered protection from the Turks to the surrounding population.

To escape a new roof-tax the counts of Heusenstamm around 1800 had the roof covering removed, as well as doors and window frames, beginning the decline of the castle. Around 1870, a large part of the great hall collapsed. Until the mid-20th century, the ruins were used for the extraction of construction materials by the local population.

In the spring of 1945 a unit of the Waffen-SS used the ruined tower above the chapel as an observation post. Russian artillery fire inflicted heavy damage to the walls.

In the second half of the 20th century a local organisation, Friends of the Castle Starhemberg, has sought to restore the ruins. Since 2007, the castle has been closed to visitors, for security.

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Details

Founded: 1140
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

marvin wiesflecker (wiesi9) (3 years ago)
Schön zum anschauen
marvin wiesi9 (wiesi9) (3 years ago)
Nice to look at
marvin wiesi9 (wiesi9) (3 years ago)
Nice to look at ? if you are interested in castles you can hike up. You walk away from a public parking lot and walk up to the old ruin for about 10-15 minutes. You can see everything and also go in at some entrances. However, the rooms are not big, about 5-10 m2 still a nice little round up (:
Harald Weinpolter (3 years ago)
Great ruin. Unfortunately this is left to its fate and expires. It is a pity that the completely impoverished Salvator-Habsburg-Lothringen family does not want to spend any money on it.
András Rab (3 years ago)
It would be nice if it was a conservation preserve, because that way it can’t be visited safely. Officially closed area. I do not recommend anyone to go among the ruins!
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