Hotel Ukraina

Moscow, Russia

The Radisson Royal Hotel is a five-star luxury hotel which still maintains its historic name of Hotel Ukraina. Hotel Ukraina was commissioned by Joseph Stalin. It was designed by Arkady Mordvinov and Vyacheslav Oltarzhevsky (leading Soviet expert on steel-framed highrise construction), and is the second tallest of the neoclassical Stalin-era 'seven sisters' (198 m, with 34 stories). It was the tallest hotel in the world from the time of its construction until the Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel opened in Atlanta, Georgia, United States in 1976. Construction on the low river bank meant that the builders had to dig well below the water level. This was enabled by an ingenious water retention system, using a perimeter of needle pumps driven deep into the ground.

The hotel opened on May 25, 1957. It closed in 2007 for a complete renovation and restoration. In 2009, the owners signed a contract with the Rezidor Hotel Group to manage the hotel as the Radisson Royal Hotel, Moscow. The hotel maintains its original name, however, for some purposes.

The hotel reopened on April 28, 2010 after its 3-year-renovation. The façade was restored in detail, while modern technology has been added, including multi-level water cleaning systems and air circulation systems.

There are also about 1,200 original paintings by the most prominent Russian artists of the first half of the 20th century, and on the first floor the diorama Moscow – Capital of the USSR in 1:75 scale shows the historical centre of Moscow and the city’s surroundings from Luzjniki to Zemlyanoi Val in the year 1977, when the artwork was created.

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Founded: 1957
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Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pascal Mercier (2 years ago)
Good value for the price. The view from the rooms is not so nice but ok. The room size are ok. Good restaurant.
Monsieur QQ (2 years ago)
Perfect business hotel - located in a wonderful building- elegant style- very friendly stuff .. спасибо
Andrea Vaca (2 years ago)
Awesome place. The best Moscow mule in town you will find it at the top of these building.
Sergey Rozenko (2 years ago)
Very expensive for the service and kind of room you can get. Mine looked old a rugged, scratched corners and crooked wardrobe. Keycards fail just as often as cheeper places, but here you also need a
Naif Al-rasheed (2 years ago)
Booked on points, got upgraded to larger room (not suite). Didn't expect 24/7 butler service starting with room entry and welcome. Front desk staff EXTREMELY helpful at check in, especially because they spoke great English! Hotel is in very centralized location, great for seeing many Moscow sites being about 3 blocks from Kremlin.
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