Burg Bruck is a medieval castle in Lienz in Tyrol. It was completed in 1278 as the residence of the Meinhardiner Counts of Görz. In 1490. the chapel was decorated with frescoes by Simon von Taisten. In 1500 the last count Leonhard of Görz bequeathed the castle to the Habsburg archduke Maximilian I of Austria, who incorporated it into his Tyrolean possessions. During the Campaigns of 1796 in the French Revolutionary Wars it was occupied by French troops under General Barthélemy Catherine Joubert. Today Bruck Castle is a museum featuring many works of the painter Albin Egger-Lienz.

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Address

Schloßberg 7, Lienz, Austria
See all sites in Lienz

Details

Founded: 1278
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Erich Ludick (4 years ago)
Beautiful place to visit
Riccardo Ballotto (4 years ago)
There were only drawings and pictures exhibition. Nice walk across the gardens. Smoothie well recommended.
Michael Valentine (4 years ago)
Incredible art museum, great place for events, wonderful staff.
Michal Jaminski (4 years ago)
Castle looks nice but the museum is closed :(
Sander Cleymans (5 years ago)
Lovely renovated castle. Old on the outside, while the inside is renovated to a mix of modern and the original materials. The temporary exhibition wasnt the most interesting, but as it's only temporary, this will change quite often. Recommended for a short visit!
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