The Carmelite friary in Lienz was founded in 1349 by the Countess Euphemia of Görz and her two sons. Although it burned down several times in the following centuries, it always received enough in donations to be able to rebuild. In about 1450 a theological college for the Carmelite Order was housed here. In the early 16th century the prior, Lucas Zach, introduced a reform to ensure that the Carmelite rule was better followed.

From 1748 to 1773 the Carmelites took on the serving of the parish of Tristach. From 1775 they also taught in the ordinary town school and from 1777 worked as professors in the Gymnasium of Lienz. Nevertheless, the friary was unable to avoid the wave of monastic suppressions under Joseph II. On 21 March 1785 the community were instructed to vacate the premises to make way for a Franciscan community previously displaced from their friary in Innsbruck. The conventual buildings, the church and all possessions passed to the state 'religion fund'. Most of the inventory was sold to the profit of the fund, including the valuable library of 4,640 volumes and 168 manuscripts.

Some works of art remain from the Carmelite period, like Gothic frescoes (15th century), cloister, with pictures from 1705 and the chapter room.

Today few Franciscans look after the parish, which has about 4,200 Catholic residents.

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Address

Muchargasse 900, Lienz, Austria
See all sites in Lienz

Details

Founded: 1349
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rita Eder (2 years ago)
Our KostnixLaden may serve the people on the premises for free. Thanks to Father Martin and Father Raimund
Margit Schlemmer-Kinzl (3 years ago)
A place of calm and strength
Alexander Lirsch (4 years ago)
Beautiful gothic church with modern style elements and cloister.
Conny Mayr (4 years ago)
Very calm and devout mood
Francesco Fatone (4 years ago)
Religious worship in the beautiful Linz
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