Groppenstein Castle

Semslach, Austria

First mentioned in historic documents in 1254, Burg Groppenstein was built in a particularly beautiful place, where the River Mallnitz flows into the River Möll. In the 15th century it was turned into a defence in the style of the late Middle Ages. In 1872 the castle was renovated by the Viennese architect Adolf Stipperger, and its exterior design has since been unchanged.

The Romanesque wing was replaced by Gothic dwellings and weirs with towers and battlement walls. The Knights Hall features beautiful, 16th century stained glass windows. Other glass paintings were added by Prof. Franz Chvostek, who owned the castle from 1936 to 1944.

Also worth a visit is the castle chapel consecrated to St. Katharina with its gothic aisle and semi-circular Romanesque apse.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

www.obervellach-reisseck.at

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Miroslav Ficza (5 years ago)
Its private. No public access.
Miroslav Ficza (5 years ago)
Its private. No public access.
Ed Stekelenburg (5 years ago)
We went there to visit the waterfalls. It was amazing and nature is great. The return route is not that spectacular and the last part is unexpectedly hard to do... But if you have no problems with that, you must go there!
Ed Stekelenburg (5 years ago)
We went there to visit the waterfalls. It was amazing and nature is great. The return route is not that spectacular and the last part is unexpectedly hard to do... But if you have no problems with that, you must go there!
Martin Višňanský (5 years ago)
Looks nice, however private area ... no public access is allowed ...
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