A fort at the site of Itter castle was first mentioned in a 1241. The previous constructions may have existed since the 10th century. The Brixental originally was a possession of the Prince-Bishops of Regensburg; the castle was an administrative seat of the Counts of Ortenburg in their capacity as Vogt bailiffs, it also served to protect the Regensburg estates from incursions undertaken by the neighbouring Archbishops of Salzburg. Nevertheless, the Brixental was acquired by Salzburg in 1312 and in 1380 the Regensburg bishops finally sold Itter to Archbishop Pilgrim II of Salzburg.

The castle was devastated during the German Peasants' War in 1526. In the 17th century, the seat of the local administration was moved to Hopfgarten, whereafter the premises decayed. After 1805 the castle was left to citizens who used it as a quarry.

The current castle

The present-day building was erected on the foundations of the former one from 1878 onwards. Itter Castle was purchased as a residence in 1884 by Sophie Menter, pianist, composer and student of Franz Liszt. Liszt himself as well as young Arthur Rubinstein stayed at the castle, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky orchestrated one of his compositions during a visit in 1892. Menter sold Itter Castle in 1902, it was again extensively remodeled in its present Tudor Revival style by later owners.

World War II

In 1943 Itter castle was transformed into a prison. Established to incarcerate prominent French prisoners valuable to the Reich, the facility was placed as a subcamp under the administration of the Dachau concentration camp.

After the war, the castle fell into disrepair until 1950 when Willi Woldrich acquired it and turned it into a luxury hotel. However, the hotel encountered financial problems and it was acquired by a holding company before it was sold to a private owner in 1985. Since that time, it has remained in private ownership and is not open to the public.

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Address

Schlossweg 1, Itter, Austria
See all sites in Itter

Details

Founded: 10th century/1878
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Axel Romoth (19 months ago)
Sehr schöner Spaziergang vom campingplatz hoch zum schloss. Sehr schöner Ausblick von da oben. Besichtigung ist leider nicht möglich. In der nähe ist der start der rodelbahn runter bis zum campingplatz. Sehr empfehlenswert.
Eduard Bruinink (20 months ago)
Dit seizoen nieuwe pachters, Rosi en Thomas Brunner en team, het begin van een nieuw tijdperk met nieuwe kansen en mogelijkheden, laat het verleden voor wat het is, gun deze zeer aardige en klantvriendelijke mensen een mooie start en een mooie toekomst op de door ons zo geliefde camping Schlossberg Itter, ooit bedacht door Hans Ager inmiddels 87 jaar oud, en woont nog steeds op de camping alwaar hij en zijn vrouw Hanny elke vrijdagavond aan de stamtisch de gasten een hartelijk welkom heet, warme camping groeten, Eduard en Bertie Bruinink.
Heksu 5 (2 years ago)
Nice place for last ww2 battle (U.S Army & Wehrmacht against Waffen SS)
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