Frauenchiemsee Abbey

Chiemsee, Germany

Frauenchiemsee monastery was founded in 782 by Tassilo III, Duke of Bavaria. After the destruction of the Hungarian incursions, the monastery"s heyday was between the 11th and 15th centuries. The monastery buildings were rebuilt between 1728 and 1732. In the course of the German Mediatisation the monastery was secularised between 1803 and 1835. King Ludwig I of Bavaria rebuilt the Benedictine monastery in 1836 under the new requirement that they should pay for the education of 'fallen women'; a reform school existed on the site until 1995.

Frauenchiemsee along with its sister island Herreninsel is one of the main tourist attractions on the Chiemsee, and is famous for the Kloster Liquor spirit, which is produced by the nuns.

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Details

Founded: 782 AD
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Part of The Frankish Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andy Kirtley (3 years ago)
Superb place
Chris Grumbine (3 years ago)
I think doesn't get much more beautiful. Also a wonderful experience to see the many little shops and the active church with island community is fantastic.
Laurentiu Mihaila (3 years ago)
An interesting mix between a religious and a commercial place.
Alex Askerman (3 years ago)
Go to Man island for a day off museums and tours, then come here to enjoy the multitude of dining options. Lovely island community and historic church. The Abbey is a nice place to stay, but you can only stay as part of a seminar group. Has a slight spider problem
Emilian Kavalski (3 years ago)
This is a beautiful spot on the Chiemsee lake. The scenery is simply stunning. This island is an awesome place to visit. There is a veil of bucolic idyll that covers the whole place. It is an incredibly picturesque sight. Should you be in the area, definitely make a visit to the lake a top priority. There is a regular ferry service and there are plenty of places where you can go hiking or cycling. Definitely, a must visit destination!
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