Kufstein Fortress

Kufstein, Austria

Kufstein fortress is one of the most impressive medieval constructions in Tyrol. It is located on a hill rising above the city of Kufstein. This fortress has already been built very early in order to control the entrance from the Alpine foothills into the Inntal valley. However, it has been mentioned for the first time in 1205 AD, when it was in possession of the bishops of Regensburg. In 1415 it was reinforced by Louis VII, Duke of Bavaria.

In 1504 the city and the fortress were besieged and conquered by Emperor Maximilian I. Maximilian had the massive round tower built between 1518 and 1522, substantially adding to its defensibility. From 1703 to 1805 it was a Bavarian possession, returning to Austria in 1814. The fortress acted as prison for a number of political dissidents during the Austro-Hungarian empire.

Today it houses the City Museum of Kufstein. Part of it is also used for concerts and meetings.

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Details

Founded: c. 1205
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrej Lenner (10 months ago)
Iconic place in Kufstein with nice views on city and surroundings
Bence Gombor (11 months ago)
A wonderful fortress on the Austrian German border with lots of Hungarian history
Christian Sciberras (11 months ago)
If you have time in Kufstein, you definitely have to visit this fortress. The views are amazing and the place itself is very interesting. Be sure to take the funicular route.
Maciej Staroniewicz (2 years ago)
Lovely place to visit on the way back from Austria (on the way to Germany). The largest outdoor pipe organ in the world is truly impressive!
Ken Mansfield (2 years ago)
Great historic place to visit. And a bonus of stunning views from the top
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