Herrenchiemsee Abbey

Chiemsee, Germany

According to tradition, the Benedictine abbey of Herrenchiemsee was established about 765 by Duke Tassilo III of Bavaria at the northern tip of the Herreninsel. New findings however indicate an even earlier foundation around 620-629 by the missionary Saint Eustace of Luxeuil.

In 969 Emperor Otto I consigned the abbey to the Archbishops of Salzburg, who in about 1130 re-established Herrenchiemsee as a monastery of Canons Regular living under the Augustinian rule. In 1215, with the approval of Pope Innocent III, Prince-Bishop Eberhard von Regensburg made the monastery church the cathedral of a diocese in its own right, the Bishopric of Chiemsee, including several parishes on the mainland and in Tyrol.

In the course of the German Mediatisation, Herrenchiemsee Abbey was secularised in 1803 and the Chiemsee bishopric finally dissolved in 1808. The island was then sold; various owners demolished the cathedral and turned the abbey into a brewery. Plans for the complete deforestation of the island were blocked by King Ludwig II, who acquired Herrenchiemsee in 1873. He had the leftover buildings converted for his private use, the complex that later became known as the 'Old Palace', where he stayed surveying the construction of the New Herrenchiemsee Palace.

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Details

Founded: 7th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Part of The Frankish Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rustem Umirzak (7 months ago)
Wonderful and amazing place. It is better to arrive there in the morning and before lunch, as after lunch there will already be a lot of people.
Tilman Benecke (8 months ago)
How nice it is to get excited about the fairy tale king wasting the people's money and then to visit one of his castles. Everything is extremely cheesy here, but somehow the whole story about this one fits remarkably well and it is definitely worth paying a visit to the whole thing. This replica of Versailles at the foot of the Bavarian Alps was the largest and most elaborate palace that Ludwig II had built.
Ignacio Gamboa (9 months ago)
I didn't care much for the castle, but the island itself is amazing. Lots of trails to walk and a beautiful garden full of statues. Also, there are ducks everywhere, which, for me... Is automatically a 5 star place.
Andrew Cheng (12 months ago)
A place you must go! Full of culture and remains well, specially the Christmas market is the beat I ever visited. You may also visit the area from Carlsplaze along the old street, churches and shops will keep you busy.
Alps (14 months ago)
Love this castle and boat trip. I could stay here forever, in these two small islands with beautiful castle with it mirror hall with crystal luster! Absolutely amazing place. We recommend you to visit Herrenchiemsee Castle and learn German history.
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