Château de Largoët

Elven, France

The Château de Largoët, also known as the Tours d'Elven (Elven Towers), is mentioned for the first time in 1020, belonging to the baron of Elven, Derrien I. The present building was constructed between the 13th and 15th centuries. The manor became the property of the Malestroit family in the 13th century. The houses of Blois and Montfort fought for it during the Breton War of Succession, before it came to the Rieux family in the 15th century. It was during this period (between 1474 and 1476) that Jean IV, lord of Rieux, protected Henry Tudor, Duke of Richmond, future King Henry VII of England. In 1490, Charles VIII of France, dismantled the castle, but it was restored under the influence of Anne de Bretagne.

Nicolas Fouquet bought it in 1656 and, after his death, it was sold to Michel de Trémeurec and stayed in his family. In the 19th century, it was proposed to demolish Largoët, given its dilapidation, but it was saved thanks to Prosper Mérimée, who had it classed as a monument historique in 1862. Beginning in the 1970s, there has been a programme of restoration.

The ruins of Largoët maintain their imposing aspect, notably because of the 14th century octagonal keep. At 45 m, it is one of the highest in France. There are five floors and the walls are between 6 and 10 m thick. On the sixth or seventh floor is the room where Henry Tudor stayed.

As well as this colossal edifice, Largoët also boasts a 15th-century gatehouse and a round tower of three storeys, from the 15th century, with cannon openings on the first level, and covered with a hexagonal building. It was furnished in the 20th century as a hunting lodge. The remains of the enclosing walls, dried up moats and a lake also exists.

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Address

Largouet, Elven, France
See all sites in Elven

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

brudassman (17 months ago)
5 euros to visit a forest
Cameron Trost (2 years ago)
Impressive Breton castle with huge tower set in woodlands.
Tina Biswas (2 years ago)
A lovely walk with woods on either side, leads up to the château. The lake adjoining the château is beautiful and enchanting. There's a dungeon tower which is accessible. The inside of the château was not accessible when we visited. The charge is 5.50€ per person.
Chris Brettell (2 years ago)
Very atmospheric. Quite along walk from the warehouse which is adorned with granite rabbits.
P-ko I (2 years ago)
この場所がイギリスの歴史と深い関係がある場所だと言うことをほとんどの方が知らないと思います。ここは、みんな大好きヘンリー8世のお父さんヘンリー7世が、王様となる前に青春時代を過ごした場所です。キープと呼ばれる塔には、彼が過ごしたであろう部屋のサインがあります。スタッフさんのお昼休みがあるので、午前の部が終わるとサイレンが鳴る仕組みのようです。もちろんそのまま居続けることもできます。駅からバスですぐです。
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