Vatican Apostolic Library

Vatican, Vatican City State

The Vatican Apostolic Library was formally established in 1475, although it is much older. It is one of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. It currently has 75,000 codices from throughout history, as well as 1.1 million printed books, which include some 8,500 incunabula.

The Vatican Library is a research library for history, law, philosophy, science and theology. The Vatican Library is open to anyone who can document their qualifications and research needs. Photocopies for private study of pages from books published between 1801 and 1990 can be requested in person or by mail.

The Vatican Secret Archives were separated from the library at the beginning of the 17th century; they contain another 150,000 items.

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Founded: 1475
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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Farid Enayati (7 months ago)
Beautiful sunset view, amazing place to take photos and get relaxed
SUSOBHAN MUKHERJEE (9 months ago)
Year 2013. I visited. It was awesome memory when I remember that day. Architecture should be seen closely. So amazing that you need to go and see the surrounding. I was amazed every moment when I saw it for first time. My words are incomplete and I am unable to describe my joy and enthusiasm when I still remember today.
Swadesh Singh (9 months ago)
Vatican City, a city-state surrounded by Rome, Italy, is the headquarters of the Roman Catholic Church. It's home to the Pope and a trove of iconic art and architecture. Its Vatican Museums house ancient Roman sculptures such as the famed “Laocoön and His Sons” as well as Renaissance frescoes in the Raphael Rooms and the Sistine Chapel, famous for Michelangelo’s ceiling.
Aaron JC (10 months ago)
Cool place if you like Jesus
Richard Casas (11 months ago)
The Christ kid and his two daughters
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Trullhalsar is a very well-preserved and restored burial field dating back to the Roman Iron Ages (0-400 AD) and Vendel period (550-800 AD). There are over 340 different kind of graves like round stones (called judgement rings), ship settings, tumuli and a viking-age picture stone (700 AD).

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