Trevi Fountain

Rome, Italy

The Trevi Fountain is the largest Baroque fountain in Rome and one of the most famous fountains in the world. The fountain has appeared in several notable films, including Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita.

The fountain at the junction of three roads marks the terminal point of the 'modern' Acqua Vergine, the revived Aqua Virgo, one of the aqueducts that supplied water to ancient Rome. In 19 BC, supposedly with the help of a virgin, Roman technicians located a source of pure water some 13 km from the city (This scene is presented on the present fountain's façade). However, the eventual indirect route of the aqueduct made its length some 22 km. This Aqua Virgo led the water into the Baths of Agrippa. It served Rome for more than 400 years.

In 1629 Pope Urban VIII, finding the earlier fountain insufficiently dramatic, asked Gian Lorenzo Bernini to sketch possible renovations, but the project was abandoned when the pope died. Though Bernini's project was never constructed, there are many Bernini touches in the fountain as it exists today.

Competitions had become the rage during the Baroque era to design buildings, fountains and even the Spanish Steps. In 1730 Pope Clement XII organized a contest in which Nicola Salvi initially lost to Alessandro Galilei, but due to the outcry in Rome over the fact that a Florentine won, Salvi was awarded the commission anyway. Work began in 1732 and the fountain was completed in 1762, long after Salvi's death, when Pietro Bracci's Oceanus (god of all water) was set in the central niche.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Piazza di Trevi 98, Rome, Italy
See all sites in Rome

Details

Founded: 1732-1762
Category:

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alessandra Porciani (6 months ago)
This is one of the most beautiful fountains I have ever seen. The area is extremely busy with pedestrian traffic so squeeze your way through the crowd and get your photos, then take time to sit and enjoy the architecture. The area is also filled with shops and restaurants, it is an excellent place to walk around and spend some time soaking in the beautiful area.
Paul Hemmelhemstead (6 months ago)
Definitely worth a visit when you're in Rome. It looks magical during the day but it looked a lot better at night time. Whatever time you go, be aware that it will be chock full of people. I'm not a big fan of crowds but it is worth waiting to approach the fountain. Good luck getting a photo without other people in it though.
David Smith (6 months ago)
The Trevi Fountain was an incredible stop and a must see while in Rome. I would recommend seeing the fountain St night but I would assume it's a magical experience at any time. There were large crowds there but everyone was very polite and as long as you are patient you will be able to approach the fountain. There were law enforcement officers on scene to ensure security at all times.
Squidgy H (6 months ago)
Worth a visit if you're in Rome, a little crowded if I'm honest but there are some lovely restaurants and shops around. Would definitely recommend visiting at night too, adds a little more ambience! Around the corner there's a magnum ice cream bar where you can also make your own magnum/design with names etc.
Arnav Singh (7 months ago)
Beautiful place during the day and night. During my visit, mid February, it was very crowded. It's a belief of throwing a coin for good luck and as a promise to return to Rome. There are lots of place to buy ice-cream, which can add to the experience as you contemplate the view. If you are looking to take pictures, you will have a chance but you have to be quick.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Hochosterwitz Castle

Hochosterwitz Castle is considered to be one of Austria's most impressive medieval castles. The rock castle is one of the state's landmarks and a major tourist attraction.

The site was first mentioned in an 860 deed issued by King Louis the German of East Francia, donating several of his properties in the former Principality of Carantania to the Archdiocese of Salzburg. In the 11th century Archbishop Gebhard of Salzburg ceded the castle to the Dukes of Carinthia from the noble House of Sponheim in return for their support during the Investiture Controversy. The Sponheim dukes bestowed the fiefdom upon the family of Osterwitz, who held the hereditary office of the cup-bearer in 1209.

In the 15th century, the last Carinthian cup-bearer, Georg of Osterwitz was captured in a Turkish invasion and died in 1476 in prison without leaving descendants. So after four centuries, on 30 May 1478, the possession of the castle reverted to Emperor Frederick III of Habsburg.

Over the next 30 years, the castle was badly damaged by numerous Turkish campaigns. On 5 October 1509, Emperor Maximilian I handed the castle as a pledge to Matthäus Lang von Wellenburg, then Bishop of Gurk. Bishop Lang undertook a substantial renovation project for the damaged castle.

About 1541, German king Ferdinand I of Habsburg bestowed Hochosterwitz upon the Carinthian governor Christof Khevenhüller. In 1571, Baron George Khevenhüller acquired the citadel by purchase. He fortified to deal with the threat of Turkish invasions of the region, building an armory and 14 gates between 1570 and 1586. Such massive fortification is considered unique in citadel construction.

Since the 16th century, no major changes have been made to Hochosterwitz. It has also remained in the possession of the Khevenhüller family as requested by the original builder, George Khevenhüller. A marble plaque dating from 1576 in the castle yard documents this request.

A specific feature is the access way to the castle passing through a total of 14 gates, which are particularly prominent owing to the castle's situation in the landscape. Tourists are allowed to walk the 620-metre long pathway through the gates up to the castle; each gate has a diagram of the defense mechanism used to seal that particular gate. The castle rooms hold a collection of prehistoric artifacts, paintings, weapons, and armor, including one set of armor 2.4 metres tall, once worn by Burghauptmann Schenk.