Trevi Fountain

Rome, Italy

The Trevi Fountain is the largest Baroque fountain in Rome and one of the most famous fountains in the world. The fountain has appeared in several notable films, including Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita.

The fountain at the junction of three roads marks the terminal point of the 'modern' Acqua Vergine, the revived Aqua Virgo, one of the aqueducts that supplied water to ancient Rome. In 19 BC, supposedly with the help of a virgin, Roman technicians located a source of pure water some 13 km from the city (This scene is presented on the present fountain's façade). However, the eventual indirect route of the aqueduct made its length some 22 km. This Aqua Virgo led the water into the Baths of Agrippa. It served Rome for more than 400 years.

In 1629 Pope Urban VIII, finding the earlier fountain insufficiently dramatic, asked Gian Lorenzo Bernini to sketch possible renovations, but the project was abandoned when the pope died. Though Bernini's project was never constructed, there are many Bernini touches in the fountain as it exists today.

Competitions had become the rage during the Baroque era to design buildings, fountains and even the Spanish Steps. In 1730 Pope Clement XII organized a contest in which Nicola Salvi initially lost to Alessandro Galilei, but due to the outcry in Rome over the fact that a Florentine won, Salvi was awarded the commission anyway. Work began in 1732 and the fountain was completed in 1762, long after Salvi's death, when Pietro Bracci's Oceanus (god of all water) was set in the central niche.

Comments

Your name



Address

Piazza di Trevi 98, Rome, Italy
See all sites in Rome

Details

Founded: 1732-1762
Category:

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ted Gautsch (5 months ago)
This is one of the most beautiful fountains I have ever seen. The area is extremely busy with pedestrian traffic so squeeze your way through the crowd and get your photos, then take time to sit and enjoy the architecture. The area is also filled with shops and restaurants, it is an excellent place to walk around and spend some time soaking in the beautiful area. Cheers!!
Jhon Henry Morales (6 months ago)
When someone who's a foodie gives a 5 star review, this better be Bobby Flay like cuisine. Listen closely, it hits the mark hands down. There's not a dish I haven't devoured nor a waiter who wasn't attentive. Owners are stellar and deserve the accolades. This isn't by accident, it's by design.
Reeve Liew (12 months ago)
Wonder attractions! Simply amazing. Nice art work and the fountain just blend in so well. For those believer, please do remember to toss a coin for some lucky wishes. And may all your dream come true!
Denisa Miruna (14 months ago)
Such a beautiful place to see in Rome ? one of the most known attractions in the city and trust me it’s worth it! The fountain has a beautiful structure and the details are just amazing. In my opinion it looks much better in reality than in pictures so I would highly recommend to visit this place if you come to Rome!
Adam Gyökhegyi (14 months ago)
A beautiful sight with an amazing array of sculptures! A true gem, great spot to take a break for some ice cream. Once again, restrictions offer a strange contrast: it's amazing to actually see everything and keep a distance, but it just doesn't have the same atmosphere.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Roman Walls of Lugo

Roman Walls of Lugo are an exceptional architectural, archaeological and constructive legacy of Roman engineering, dating from the 3rd and 4th centuries AD. The Walls are built of internal and external stone facings of slate with some granite, with a core filling of a conglomerate of slate slabs and worked stone pieces from Roman buildings, interlocked with lime mortar.

Their total length of 2117 m in the shape of an oblong rectangle occupies an area of 1.68 ha. Their height varies between 8 and 10 m, with a width of 4.2 m, reaching 7 m in some specific points. The walls still contain 85 external towers, 10 gates (five of which are original and five that were opened in modern times), four staircases and two ramps providing access to the walkway along the top of the walls, one of which is internal and the other external. Each tower contained access stairs leading from the intervallum to the wall walk of town wall, of which a total of 21 have been discovered to date.

The defences of Lugo are the most complete and best preserved example of Roman military architecture in the Western Roman Empire.

Despite the renovation work carried out, the walls conserve their original layout and the construction features associated with their defensive purpose, with walls, battlements, towers, fortifications, both modern and original gates and stairways, and a moat.

Since they were built, the walls have defined the layout and growth of the city, which was declared a Historical-Artistic Ensemble in 1973, forming a part of it and becoming an emblematic structure that can be freely accessed to walk along. The local inhabitants and visitors alike have used them as an area for enjoyment and as a part of urban life for centuries.

The fortifications were added to UNESCO"s World Heritage List in late 2000 and are a popular tourist attraction.