Palatine Hill

Rome, Italy

The Palatine Hill is the centremost of the Seven Hills of Rome and is one of the most ancient parts of the city. It stands 40 metres above the Roman Forum, looking down upon it on one side, and upon the Circus Maximus on the other. From the time of Augustus Imperial palaces were built here and hence it became the etymological origin of the word palace and its cognates in other languages (Italian palazzo, French palais, German Palast).

According to Roman mythology, the Palatine Hill was the location of the cave, known as the Lupercal, where Romulus and Remus were found by the she-wolf Lupa that kept them alive. Another legend occuring on the Palatine is Hercules' defeat of Cacus after the monster had stolen some cattle. Hercules struck Cacus with his characteristic club so hard that it formed a cleft on the southeast corner of the hill, where later a staircase bearing the name of Cacus was constructed.

Rome has its origins on the Palatine. Excavations show that people have lived in the area since the 10th century BC. The Palatine Hill was also the site of the ancient festival of the Lupercalia. Many affluent Romans of the Republican period (c.509 BC-44 BC) had their residences there.

From the start of the Empire (27 BC) Augustus built his palace there and the hill gradually became the exclusive domain of emperors; the ruins of the palaces of at least Augustus (27 BC-14 AD), Tiberius (14-37 AD) and Domitian (81-96 AD) can still be seen. Augustus also built a temple to Apollo here. The great fire of 64 AD destroyed Nero's palace, but he replaced it by 69 AD with the even larger Domus Aurea over which was built Domitian's Palace

Monuments

The Palatine Hill is an archaeological site open to the public. The Palace of Domitian which dominates the site and looks out over the Circus Maximus was rebuilt largely during the reign of Domitian over earlier buildings of Nero.

The House of 'Livia', the wife of Augustus, is conventially attributed to her based only on the generic name on a clay pipe and circumstantial factors such as proximity to the House of Augustus. The building is located near the Temple of Magna Mater at the western end of the hill, on a lower terrace from the temple. It is notable for its beautiful frescoes.

The House of Tiberius is located next to the Temple of Cybele, on the platform built by Nero and in the current Farnese Gardens.

There are also remains of other temples and palaces on the Palatine Hill.

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Details

Founded: 10th century BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Melissa (44 days ago)
If you visit the Colosseum, you must visit Palatine hill as it’s right across the way. Beautiful and well preserved Roman ruins with plenty of scenic viewpoints to take pictures of the city. You don’t need a tour guide as there are plenty of signs explaining the history behind some of the buildings.
justin wong (2 months ago)
Visited early November and it was quite busy due to lots of guided tour groups however wait time was minimum and the views of this historic ruins is simply stunning and I wouldn’t recommend missing!
Christopher Lucernoni (4 months ago)
We loved this place. There is so much history and so much to see. In fact, we didn't have the time to explore the entire area. It's basically an open air museum. They had a working roman fountain, an over look of the hippodrome and stadium, all kinds of houses and a palace. All kinds of stuff. The tickets are not sold for just the Palatine Hill. You either buy tickets for the hill, forum and Colosseum - and have to pick a specific time for the colosseum, or you buy tickets for just the forum and hill. I would buy them on a day when you can hit them all. It would be a long day though. Overall this was a fantastic experience.
Matthias Woortmann (6 months ago)
The hill provides very nice gardens and amazing views to all directions
Martin Johnson (6 months ago)
Closes by 6:30pm even in rush tourist season
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