Palatine Hill

Rome, Italy

The Palatine Hill is the centremost of the Seven Hills of Rome and is one of the most ancient parts of the city. It stands 40 metres above the Roman Forum, looking down upon it on one side, and upon the Circus Maximus on the other. From the time of Augustus Imperial palaces were built here and hence it became the etymological origin of the word palace and its cognates in other languages (Italian palazzo, French palais, German Palast).

According to Roman mythology, the Palatine Hill was the location of the cave, known as the Lupercal, where Romulus and Remus were found by the she-wolf Lupa that kept them alive. Another legend occuring on the Palatine is Hercules' defeat of Cacus after the monster had stolen some cattle. Hercules struck Cacus with his characteristic club so hard that it formed a cleft on the southeast corner of the hill, where later a staircase bearing the name of Cacus was constructed.

Rome has its origins on the Palatine. Excavations show that people have lived in the area since the 10th century BC. The Palatine Hill was also the site of the ancient festival of the Lupercalia. Many affluent Romans of the Republican period (c.509 BC-44 BC) had their residences there.

From the start of the Empire (27 BC) Augustus built his palace there and the hill gradually became the exclusive domain of emperors; the ruins of the palaces of at least Augustus (27 BC-14 AD), Tiberius (14-37 AD) and Domitian (81-96 AD) can still be seen. Augustus also built a temple to Apollo here. The great fire of 64 AD destroyed Nero's palace, but he replaced it by 69 AD with the even larger Domus Aurea over which was built Domitian's Palace

Monuments

The Palatine Hill is an archaeological site open to the public. The Palace of Domitian which dominates the site and looks out over the Circus Maximus was rebuilt largely during the reign of Domitian over earlier buildings of Nero.

The House of 'Livia', the wife of Augustus, is conventially attributed to her based only on the generic name on a clay pipe and circumstantial factors such as proximity to the House of Augustus. The building is located near the Temple of Magna Mater at the western end of the hill, on a lower terrace from the temple. It is notable for its beautiful frescoes.

The House of Tiberius is located next to the Temple of Cybele, on the platform built by Nero and in the current Farnese Gardens.

There are also remains of other temples and palaces on the Palatine Hill.

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Details

Founded: 10th century BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ali Delshad (8 days ago)
It’s the most amazing place in rome in my opinion. I cannot believe how they made this place many years ago.
Zoltan Hanko (39 days ago)
Do not buy guided tour. Don't! Except if you want to pay triple of the original price. Skip the line tour is also waiting. Then you will have 50 minutes to see Palatinus Hill and around. They want to earn lot of money and get discounted price while people pays for whole ticket. Suggestion: buy ticket for time in advance and be there in time or wake up early morning and be there by 8:30 or even earlier!
Giang Le (41 days ago)
We went to Palatine hill. We wanted to see everything from above before get closer to it. 40 meters above the Roman Rorum, from there, we could see everything or at least a part of everything. I could imagine how big it was and how nice it was in the past with all those architecture around [ or a part of them].
Robyn Moore (2 months ago)
A fantastic place to visit and absorb the might and wonder of the Roman Empire. Was amazed that visitors can walk among the ruins. Could have spent many more hours here.
Tal Chepoy (3 months ago)
We were there as a part of a tour to Colosseum. The hill is kind of a second part of a guided tour. It is a big place, very ... green with a plenty of history behind. Nice stories were told by our guide - from the beginning of time and later, related to the city of Rome, its creation and development. IMHO the place itself worth spending that hour of your trip.
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