Largo di Torre Argentina

Rome, Italy

Largo di Torre Argentina is a square that hosts four Republican Roman temples, and the remains of Pompey's Theatre. The name of the square comes from the Torre Argentina, which takes its name from the city of Strasbourg, whose Latin name was Argentoratum.

The four temples, originally designated by the letters A, B, C, and D, front onto a paved street, which was reconstructed in the imperial era, after the fire of AD 80. The area was delineated to the north by the Hecatostylum (one-hundred columns porch) and the Baths of Agrippa, and to the south by the buildings related to the Circus Flaminius, to the east by the great porched square of Porticus Minucia Frumentaria, and to the west by the Theatre of Pompey.

Julius Caesar was killed in the Curia of the Theatre of Pompey, and the spot he was believed to be assassinated is in the square.

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