Spanish Steps

Rome, Italy

The Spanish Steps (Scalinata di Trinità dei Monti) are a set of steps in Rome, Italy, climbing a steep slope between the Piazza di Spagna at the base and Piazza Trinità dei Monti, dominated by the Trinità dei Monti church at the top.

The monumental stairway of 135 steps was built with French diplomat Étienne Gueffier's bequeathed funds of 20,000 scudi, in 1723-1725, linking the Bourbon Spanish Embassy, and the Trinità dei Monti church that was under the patronage of the Bourbon kings of France, both located above - to the Holy See in Palazzo Monaldeschi located below. The stairway was designed by architects Francesco de Sanctis and Alessandro Specchi.

The Steps are featured in numerous film and novel scenes.

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Address

Piazza di Spagna 23, Rome, Italy
See all sites in Rome

Details

Founded: 1723-1725
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More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

nalin rawat (13 months ago)
Pleasurable evening, Shopping, etc. You name it and you can find everything in a single place. There is a fountain in front of it. Live shows, live music by local musicians, etc. make up for a perfect evening. Since it is at a height so the view of the nightlife is awesome from Spanish steps.
Sina Kashani (13 months ago)
It is a beautiful staircase near Spanish embassy. It is couple hundred of steps to the top but well worth it. The fountain and the pool in front are also very beautiful. The area is very crowded and you will struggle to take a decent shot. People take a rest on stairs and take advantage of surrounding.
Tyler Parrott (13 months ago)
What a beautiful place! There were many people out in the evening time around sunset and definitely made me feel alive. The view from the bottom looking up is fantastic. There is also a nice cafe at the top overlooking the steps.
B Lau (14 months ago)
Nice spot to relax and enjoy the sun and pulsating city of Rome with all the bypassing tourists and stylish Italians. You're not allowed to eat on the stairs as you'll be told by the auxiliary police. People do it anyway. It's right be the Spagna metro station so it's a good starting point to go inside the old city west wards.
Loreta Ozolina (14 months ago)
As expected :) lovely views from above! Doesn't take too long to get up at the top as the steps are not as big. Be careful of the men selling roses etc. They give it to you, flatter you and ask your partner for money
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