Amphitheatrum Castrense

Rome, Italy

The Amphitheatrum Castrense is a Roman amphitheatre next to the church of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme. It is dated to the first decades of the 3rd century AD. It was part of an Imperial villa complex which was built by emperors of the Severan dynasty. The open arches of the outer walls were walled up when the building was incorporated into the Aurelian Walls (271-275 AD), at which point it stopped being used for spectacles and began to be used as fortification, and the ground level around the building was lowered.

In the middle of the 16th century the remains of the second story were demolished for defensive needs. In the 18th century, a Hypogeum was found beneath the arena, filled with the bones of large animals. This leads researchers to believe that the spectacles here included Venationes, the hunting and killing of wild animals. Palladio and Étienne Dupérac made drawings about the ruins.

The building is a regular ellipse 88 meters long and 75.80 meters wide. It is constructed out of brick-faced concrete, with a few decorative elements in travertine. The structure was three stories high but only a section of the lowest story is preserved.

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Address

Via Nola 10, Rome, Italy
See all sites in Rome

Details

Founded: c. 220 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mirjana Prekovic (21 months ago)
Amazing historic site
Giuseppe Rufini (21 months ago)
Poco conosciuto non apre spesso parte del complesso di Santa Croce in Gerusalemme !
Ennio Petrella (2 years ago)
spettacolare, non per questo viene chiamata la città eterna
Rasp Berry (2 years ago)
Same as the pyramide of Cestio this building has been saved by pure accident by incorporating it into the walls. It show the messy and "temporary" plan for the quick as possible build of city defences by reusing structures on the way (as every temporary solution it also remained in use for 1600 years). The walls of Constantinopolis were build by plan and much better designed.
İhsan Yeneroğlu (4 years ago)
Not much to see and also close for visit
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