Baths of Trajan

Rome, Italy

The Baths of Trajan were a massive thermae, a bathing and leisure complex, built in ancient Rome starting from 104 AD and dedicated during the Kalends of July in 109. Commissioned by Emperor Trajan, the complex of baths occupied space on the southern side of the Oppian Hill on the outskirts of what was then the main developed area of the city, although still inside the boundary of the Servian Wall. The baths were being utilized mainly as a recreational and social center by Roman citizens, both men and women, as late as the early 5th century.

The complex seems to have been deserted soon afterwards as a cemetery dated to the 5th century (which remained in use until the 7th century) has been found in front of the northeastern exedra. The baths were thus no longer in use at the time of the siege of Rome by the Goths in 537; with the destruction of the Roman aqueducts, all thermae were abandoned, as was the whole of the now-waterless Mons Oppius.

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Founded: 104 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

kojiki123 (20 months ago)
It could have been great :) All these remains really show the 'greatness' of old times. Fantastic place for resting. Nice walk paths and scenic ruins for taking beautiful photos. If in Rome it's a must see, just to see sth different, not so known but also fantastic.
S.Y. Park (21 months ago)
It was an interesting archeological site. It required a lot of imaginations and a lot of reading to relate the ruin as a bath, though. Maybe my expectations were too high, but it's not worth the second visit, IMO.
Xxx Yyy (2 years ago)
This is very near the colosseum. It’s free to enter this ruins, so don’t expect too much. If possible, visit this before or after the Domus Aurea tour, their stories are linked
Andrew Smith (2 years ago)
An amazing site for history but like many park or monument areas in Rome it needs attention and off bounds. It is worth visiting to see the history but there is limited things to do here and be careful of pickpockets/rude sellers on the street. Tip...do not let people distract you or tie bracelets to you.
Dariusz Woysław Miller (2 years ago)
Today are only ruins, a shadow of the former glory. But is significant not because of aestetics, is because 5his because the history.
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