Circus of Maxentius

Rome, Italy

The Circus of Maxentius is an ancient part of a complex erected by emperor Maxentius on the Via Appia between AD 306 and 312. It is situated between the second and third miles of the Via Appia between the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella, which dominates the hill that rises immediately to the east of the complex.

The Circus itself is the best preserved in the area of Rome, and is second only in size to the Circus Maximus in Rome. The only games recorded at the circus were its inaugural ones and these are generally thought to have been funerary in character. They would have been held in honour of Maxentius' son Valerius Romulus, who died in AD 309 at a very young age and who was probably interred in the adjacent cylindrical tomb (tomb of Romulus). The imperial box of the circus is connected, via a covered portico, to the villa of Maxentius, whose scant remains are today obscured by dense foliage, except for the apse of the basilical audience hall, which pokes out from the tree tops. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312.

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Details

Founded: 306-312
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jason Pecoraro (3 months ago)
This place was rad!!! Get here for sure
Dean Marais (4 months ago)
Best ruins of a circus I've seen. Can really picture the scale. Breathtaking to imagine
Francisco Carlos Garcia Lopez (10 months ago)
Terrific nice. I love Rome
Dolcevia Redactie (2 years ago)
Interesting historical site, worthy of a visit along the Appian Way.
Kees Visser (3 years ago)
Near the Via Appia Antica. It's the best preserved circus. And still you have to use your imagination. But that's Roman monuments so special. When we visited the site there was a market with people dressed as Roman. Nice extra
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