Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus

Rome, Italy

Valerius Romulus (c. 292/295 - 309) was the son of the Caesar and later usurper Maxentius and of Valeria Maximilla, daughter of Emperor Galerius. He was buried in a tomb along the Via Appia. The restored tomb stands within a grand sporting arena known as the Circus of Maxentius, itself part of a broader imperial complex built by the emperor Maxentius in the early fourth century AD.

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 309 AD
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lara Giuliana Gouveia Simonetti (2 years ago)
The catacombs are a most dramatic and interesting experience. You step through an unassuming door, and as you descend the stairs the heat of the day leaches away. The empty alcoves stretch out before you, and line the walls of the many side tunnels (which sink into darkness). Particularly interesting are the frescos, whose meaning are very ably explained by the tour guide. Above ground, the Mausoleum of Saint Helena is a very impressive edifice. The internal museum is well worth the ticket price. Both aspects of the site are better suited to Italian speakers, although a guidebook is available in English.
Lara Giuliana Gouveia Simonetti (2 years ago)
The catacombs are a most dramatic and interesting experience. You step through an unassuming door, and as you descend the stairs the heat of the day leaches away. The empty alcoves stretch out before you, and line the walls of the many side tunnels (which sink into darkness). Particularly interesting are the frescos, whose meaning are very ably explained by the tour guide. Above ground, the Mausoleum of Saint Helena is a very impressive edifice. The internal museum is well worth the ticket price. Both aspects of the site are better suited to Italian speakers, although a guidebook is available in English.
Carlisle Gomes (3 years ago)
We wanted to visit one of the catacombs while in Rome and chose St. Marcellino Pietro. So happy we did. We decided at the last minute and emailed them from the website. Flavio responded immediately to confirm. At the site Julia was our tour guide and shared a lot of knowledge with us. Many Christians were buried here and you can see the different burial places all underground including some human bones in one place! Pathways are uneven and the tour involves stairs and slanted alleys all very narrow. Ticket was only €8 each and well worth it. Took maybe an hour. Thank you Julia!!!
Carlisle Gomes (3 years ago)
We wanted to visit one of the catacombs while in Rome and chose St. Marcellino Pietro. So happy we did. We decided at the last minute and emailed them from the website. Flavio responded immediately to confirm. At the site Julia was our tour guide and shared a lot of knowledge with us. Many Christians were buried here and you can see the different burial places all underground including some human bones in one place! Pathways are uneven and the tour involves stairs and slanted alleys all very narrow. Ticket was only €8 each and well worth it. Took maybe an hour. Thank you Julia!!!
Dan Brier (3 years ago)
Visited here with the family including children aged 11 to 7. We had a wonderful visit guided by a knowledgable and engaged guide in English. We were the only people on the tour. The kids and adults both loved it. Cost was 36e for the six of us. Take cash as they don't accept cards.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Château d'Olhain

The Château d'Olhain is probably the most famous castle of the Artois region. It is located in the middle of a lake which reflects its picturesque towers and curtain walls. It was also a major stronghold for the Artois in medieval times and testimony to the power of the Olhain family, first mentioned from the 12th century.

The existence of the castle was known early in the 13th century, but the present construction is largely the work of Jean de Nielles, who married Marie d’Olhain at the end of the 15th century.

The marriage of Alix Nielles to Jean de Berghes, Grand Veneur de France (master of hounds) to the King, meant the castle passed to this family, who kept it for more than 450 years. Once confiscated by Charles Quint, it suffered during the wars that ravaged the Artois. Besieged in 1641 by the French, it was partly demolished by the Spaniards in 1654, and finally blown-up and taken by the Dutch in 1710. Restored in 1830, it was abandoned after 1870, and sold by the last Prince of Berghes in 1900. There is also evidence that one of the castles occupants was related to Charles de Batz-Castelmore d'Artagnan, the person Alexandre Dumas based his Three Musketeers charictor d'Artagnan on.

During the World War I and World War II, the castle was requisitioned first by French troops, then Canadian and British soldiers. The current owner has restored the castle to its former glory.