Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus

Rome, Italy

Valerius Romulus (c. 292/295 - 309) was the son of the Caesar and later usurper Maxentius and of Valeria Maximilla, daughter of Emperor Galerius. He was buried in a tomb along the Via Appia. The restored tomb stands within a grand sporting arena known as the Circus of Maxentius, itself part of a broader imperial complex built by the emperor Maxentius in the early fourth century AD.

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Founded: 309 AD
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lara Giuliana Gouveia Simonetti (15 months ago)
The catacombs are a most dramatic and interesting experience. You step through an unassuming door, and as you descend the stairs the heat of the day leaches away. The empty alcoves stretch out before you, and line the walls of the many side tunnels (which sink into darkness). Particularly interesting are the frescos, whose meaning are very ably explained by the tour guide. Above ground, the Mausoleum of Saint Helena is a very impressive edifice. The internal museum is well worth the ticket price. Both aspects of the site are better suited to Italian speakers, although a guidebook is available in English.
Lara Giuliana Gouveia Simonetti (15 months ago)
The catacombs are a most dramatic and interesting experience. You step through an unassuming door, and as you descend the stairs the heat of the day leaches away. The empty alcoves stretch out before you, and line the walls of the many side tunnels (which sink into darkness). Particularly interesting are the frescos, whose meaning are very ably explained by the tour guide. Above ground, the Mausoleum of Saint Helena is a very impressive edifice. The internal museum is well worth the ticket price. Both aspects of the site are better suited to Italian speakers, although a guidebook is available in English.
Carlisle Gomes (2 years ago)
We wanted to visit one of the catacombs while in Rome and chose St. Marcellino Pietro. So happy we did. We decided at the last minute and emailed them from the website. Flavio responded immediately to confirm. At the site Julia was our tour guide and shared a lot of knowledge with us. Many Christians were buried here and you can see the different burial places all underground including some human bones in one place! Pathways are uneven and the tour involves stairs and slanted alleys all very narrow. Ticket was only €8 each and well worth it. Took maybe an hour. Thank you Julia!!!
Carlisle Gomes (2 years ago)
We wanted to visit one of the catacombs while in Rome and chose St. Marcellino Pietro. So happy we did. We decided at the last minute and emailed them from the website. Flavio responded immediately to confirm. At the site Julia was our tour guide and shared a lot of knowledge with us. Many Christians were buried here and you can see the different burial places all underground including some human bones in one place! Pathways are uneven and the tour involves stairs and slanted alleys all very narrow. Ticket was only €8 each and well worth it. Took maybe an hour. Thank you Julia!!!
Dan Brier (2 years ago)
Visited here with the family including children aged 11 to 7. We had a wonderful visit guided by a knowledgable and engaged guide in English. We were the only people on the tour. The kids and adults both loved it. Cost was 36e for the six of us. Take cash as they don't accept cards.
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