Arch of Septimius Severus

Rome, Italy

The white marble Arch of Septimius Severus at the northwest end of the Roman Forum is a triumphal arch dedicated in AD 203 to commemorate the Parthian victories of Emperor Septimius Severus.  and his two sons, Caracalla and Geta.

After the death of Septimius Severus, his sons Caracalla and Geta were initially joint emperors. Caracalla had Geta assassinated in 212; Geta's memorials were destroyed and all images or mentions of him were removed from public buildings and monuments. Accordingly, Geta's image and inscriptions referring to him were removed from the arch.

The arch was raised on a travertine base originally approached by steps from the Forum's ancient level. The central archway, spanned by a richly coffered semicircular vault, has lateral openings to each side archway, a feature copied in many Early Modern triumphal arches. The Arch is about 23 metres in height, 25 metres in width and 11.85 metres deep.

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Address

Via della Curia 4, Rome, Italy
See all sites in Rome

Details

Founded: 203 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David F (11 months ago)
very impressive
李小乐 (2 years ago)
Very nice to see.
Milen Dimitrov (2 years ago)
Less impressive than the Titus arch, and newer with a century. It is either worse repaired than the Titus arch, or the original material is worse. It is built to commemorate the victories of the Roman against the Partians in the end of 2nd Century AD. MAybe the most prominent feature is the damnatio memoriea - Caracalla, the son of Septimus Severus, ordered he name of his brother Geta, to be removed from the inscription.
Michael Stephens (2 years ago)
Located at the heart of the ancient Roman Empire in the Forum, it is as spectacular as the place itself.
WILLIAM FERNANDES (2 years ago)
One of the Arch's next to forum Romano. It is made of marble and has some statues attached to it. The statues were picked up from other monuments and the face was "rebuild" with the faces of the heroes of that time. The Arch is inside of the Palatine suronded by lots of great and historic monuments. To visit Palatine you need to buy a ticket, which is also sold in the entrance. The visit worth!
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