Quirinal Palace

Rome, Italy

The Quirinal Palace is one of the three current official residences of the President of the Italian Republic. It is located on the Quirinal Hill, the highest of the seven hills of Rome. It has housed thirty Popes, four Kings of Italy and twelve presidents of the Italian Republic. The palace extends for an area of 110,500 square metres and is the ninth-largest palace in the world. 

The current site of the palace has been in use since Roman times. During the reign of Constantine the last complex of Roman baths was built here. The Quirinal became a popular spot for the Roman patricians, who built their luxurious villas. An example of those are the remains of a villa in the Quirinal gardens, where a mosaic, part of the old floor has been found.

The current palace was built in 1583 by Pope Gregory XIII as a papal summer residence. The pope commissioned the architect Ottaviano Mascherino to build a palace with porticoed parallel wings and an internal court. The project was not fully completed due to the death of the pope in 1585 but it is still recognisable in the north part of the court, especially in the double loggia facade, topped by the panoramic Torre dei venti (tower of the winds) or Torrino. To the latter, a bell tower was added according to a project by Carlo Maderno and Francesco Borromini.

The Palace was also used as the location for papal conclaves in 1823, 1829, 1831, and 1846. It served as a papal residence and housed the central offices responsible for the civil government of the Papal States until 1870 when the Papal States were merged in the united Kingdom of Italy. The palace became the official royal residence of the Kings of Italy. The monarchy was abolished in 1946 and the Palace became the official residence and workplace for the Presidents of the Italian Republic.

The Quirinal Gardens, famous for their privileged position that makes of them almost an 'island' elevated on Rome, were over the centuries changed depending on the tastes and needs of the papal court.

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Details

Founded: 1583
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Petre Irimus (9 months ago)
Impressive official buildings and the square to rest a while when traveling in Rome
Claudia Schiavon (14 months ago)
Full of history art. Amazing guides
cerys Davies (15 months ago)
It was interesting. Cant say it's for the general non italian speaking tourist, but if you can make up your own version of what's being said or be organised and google an english brief paragraph of the rooms so you understand what the significance of the room is, then great. Some of the rooms have got a wow factor. And there is a particular chandelier that's...interesting. Not for the faint of heart. We did the long tour and it did feel like it dragged at some points. We were on a tour with school teenagers and glad to see that they were just as riveted as us. The tour guide from his vigorous hand and facial expressions exuded passion and knowledge so as long as you can understand him, it's perfect.
Piseth Mao (15 months ago)
It looks nice and historical from the outside but I didn't have a chance to go inside so I can't comment.
Joanna Lucja (15 months ago)
Fantastic place to visit. Very quiet indeed and full of art.
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