Quirinal Palace

Rome, Italy

The Quirinal Palace is one of the three current official residences of the President of the Italian Republic. It is located on the Quirinal Hill, the highest of the seven hills of Rome. It has housed thirty Popes, four Kings of Italy and twelve presidents of the Italian Republic. The palace extends for an area of 110,500 square metres and is the ninth-largest palace in the world. 

The current site of the palace has been in use since Roman times. During the reign of Constantine the last complex of Roman baths was built here. The Quirinal became a popular spot for the Roman patricians, who built their luxurious villas. An example of those are the remains of a villa in the Quirinal gardens, where a mosaic, part of the old floor has been found.

The current palace was built in 1583 by Pope Gregory XIII as a papal summer residence. The pope commissioned the architect Ottaviano Mascherino to build a palace with porticoed parallel wings and an internal court. The project was not fully completed due to the death of the pope in 1585 but it is still recognisable in the north part of the court, especially in the double loggia facade, topped by the panoramic Torre dei venti (tower of the winds) or Torrino. To the latter, a bell tower was added according to a project by Carlo Maderno and Francesco Borromini.

The Palace was also used as the location for papal conclaves in 1823, 1829, 1831, and 1846. It served as a papal residence and housed the central offices responsible for the civil government of the Papal States until 1870 when the Papal States were merged in the united Kingdom of Italy. The palace became the official royal residence of the Kings of Italy. The monarchy was abolished in 1946 and the Palace became the official residence and workplace for the Presidents of the Italian Republic.

The Quirinal Gardens, famous for their privileged position that makes of them almost an 'island' elevated on Rome, were over the centuries changed depending on the tastes and needs of the papal court.

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Founded: 1583
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Barbara Szymonowicz (30 days ago)
Very nice place with good views
George Chang (2 months ago)
Not sure what government building this place is, but the Alfa Romeo giulia police cars are really cool. You can’t enter here BTW.
Aurelia Ghenuche (2 months ago)
Stunning building, all the interiors are incredibly beautiful. I've taken the institutional tour, the guide was a history student, quite nervous (understandable) and he rushed it a bit but he did a good job overall. It's definitely worth a visit and it's basically free.
Bogdan Marcelan (6 months ago)
Palazzo del Quirinale is a historic building in Rome. It is the official residence of the President of the Italian Republic. It stands on the Quirinal, the highest of the seven hills in Rome. Four kings, thirty popes and eleven presidents of the Italian Republic lived in the palace.
Franco Pecchio (2 years ago)
Book very in advance your visit, don't miss the experience of the ritual Sundays midday concert. Check their website for it. Always an experience to walk in these marvelous rooms and salons
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