Basilica of Saints John and Paul

Rome, Italy

The Basilica of Saints John and Paul on the Caelian Hill was built in 398 AD over the home of two Roman soldiers, John and Paul, martyred under the emperor Julian in 362. The church was thus called the Titulus Pammachii and is recorded as such in the acts of the synod held by Pope Symmachus in 499.

The church was damaged during the sack by Alaric I (410) and because of an earthquake (442), restored by Pope Paschal I (824), sacked again by the Normans (1084), and again restored, with the addition of a monastery and a bell tower.

The church has three naves, with pillars joined to the original columns. The altar is built over a bath, which holds the remains of the two martyrs. The apse is frescoed with Christ in Glory (1588) by Cristoforo Roncalli. Below this fresco are three paintings: a Martyrdom of St John, a Martyrdom of St Paul, and the Conversion of Terenziano (1726) by Giovanni Domenico Piastrini, Giacomo Triga, and Pietro Andrea Barbieri.

During excavations performed in the 19th century, a series of Ancient Roman rooms were discovered under the nave of the church. Some of these rooms date back to the first and fourth centuries AD. In one room an elegant third-century AD fresco depicting Proserpine and other divinities among cherubs in a boat can be found, as can traces of another marine fresco and mosaics in the window arches.

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Address

Clivo di Scauro, Rome, Italy
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Details

Founded: 398 AD
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Martin Faughy (4 years ago)
A great experience and a good day out Best to arrive early to beat the crowds
Darryl Rich (4 years ago)
Great little church near Roman Forum (but a lot of steps to get to it). Free admission - worth seeing if in the area. 15-20min max.
Justin Lukasavige (4 years ago)
We did an underground tour with Through Eternity and this place was brought to life. From pagan time to early Christianity, walking on the old streets and viewing ancient homes this was all very interesting to learn. John and Paul were interesting to learn about.
R Jensen (4 years ago)
Superb Basilica. One of 4 largest in Rome. A must see, when in Rome. Easy access by Metro and tram.
Debra Hodson (4 years ago)
Beautiful. Well worth a visit. Should be more prominent on tourist routes.
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