Basilica di Sant'Anastasia al Palatino

Rome, Italy

Sant'Anastasia curch was built between the late 3rd and early 4th century, possibly by a Roman woman named Anastasia. The church is listed under the titulus Anastasiae in the acts of the 499 synod. Later the church was entitled to the martyr with the same name, Anastasia of Sirmium.

The church was restored several times: Pope Damasus I (366-383), Pope Hilarius (461-468), Pope John VII (705-707), Pope Leo III (795-816), and Pope Gregory IV (827-844). The current church dates back to the 17th century restoration commissioned by Pope Urban VII.

Traditionally, the church is connected to the cult of St Jerome, who possibly celebrated mass here. The saint is depicted over the altar, by Domenichino.

The last restoration, after the restoration during the papacy of Sixtus IV, occurred in 1636, when the facade, with lower doric and upper ionic order, was reconstructed in 1636, after the cyclone of 1634. The nave recycles antique columns. The ceiling is frescoed with a martyrdom of the saints (1722) by Michelangelo Cerruti.

The chapel to the right, has a painting of St. John the Baptist by Pier Francesco Mola. The right transept has a painting of S.Toribio (1726) by Francesco Trevisani. The high altar has a Nativity by Lazzaro Baldi and below the altar is a statue of Saint Anastasia by Ercole Ferrata. It clearly shows the influence of Bernini's Beata Ludovica Albertoni. The left transept has a Madonna of the Rosary by Baldi, and the tomb of Cardinal and philologist Angelo Mai by the late neoclassical sculptor Giovanni Maria Benzoni. The last chapel to the left, by Domenichino depicts a St. Jerome. The other chapel has a Ss.Giorgio e Publio by Etienne Parrocel.

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Address

Via dei Cerchi 75, Rome, Italy
See all sites in Rome

Details

Founded: c. 300 AD
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vasili Timonen (2 years ago)
The church is open 24/7, and has been since 2001 when Perpetual Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament began here. This is a 4th century church, but repeated remodelling means that the age is not obvious inside. Outside, if you go up the left hand side you will see some interesting ancient fabric. Mass is celebrated daily at 18:00, preceded by the Rosary. The Adoration takes place in the far left hand chapel. There is no leeway given here for behaviour and clothing inappropriate to a church. However, the warning notice by the entrance shows a sense of humour -who is the sexy cartoon lady on it?
Asher Berry (2 years ago)
A quiet piazza to site and relax, just off the beaten path
Bartosz W (2 years ago)
ok
Nick Passakas (3 years ago)
Nice little picturesque church in the Roman Forum, worth stopping by here.
David Kuris (3 years ago)
Nice
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