San Lorenzo in Lucina

Rome, Italy

The Minor Basilica of St. Lawrence in Lucina is dedicated to St. Lawrence of Rome, deacon and martyr. The name 'Lucina' derives from that of the Roman matron of the AD 4th century who permitted Christians to erect a church on the site. Putatively, Pope Marcellus I hid on the site during the persecutions of Roman Emperor Maxentius, and Pope Damasus I was elected there in AD 366. Pope Sixtus III consecrated a church on the site in 440 AD. The church was first reconstructed by Pope Paschal II in the early 12th century.

In 1606, Pope Paul V assigned the basilica to the order of Clerics Regular Minor. Cosimo Fanzago completely renovated the interior in the 17th century, including conversion of the lateral aisles of the basilica into chapels. The ceiling was also frescoed by the Neapolitan Mometto Greuter.

In the 19th century, in a subsequent restoration of the interior that Pope Pius I commissioned the Baroque decorations in the nave were replaced with frescoes that Roberto Bompiani painted.

In the rebuilding of 1650, the aisled basilical plan was destroyed and the lateral naves were replaced by Baroque chapels, which were then leased to noble families to decorate and use as mausolea. This was done by inserting walls behind the piers of the arcades. The arcades themselves have solid, square piers with imposts. The flat ceiling is coffered, gilded, and decorated with rosettes and has a painting of the Apotheosis of St. Lawrence in the central panel. This ceiling was made in 1857 under Pope Pius IX.

Guido Reni's Christ on the Cross (1639-40) is visible above the high altar, framed by six Corinthian columns of black marble. Below the altar is a reliquary in which is preserved the gridiron on which tradition maintains that St. Lawrence was martyred. The marble throne of Pope Paschal II in the apse behind the high altar has an inscription that records the translation to the basilica of its relics of St. Lawrence of Rome. A Madonna and Child with John of Nepomuk and Archangel Michael by Onofrio Avellino hangs in the apse behind the high altar.

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Details

Founded: 440 AD
Category: Religious sites in Italy

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joseph Benny (5 months ago)
A 5 century basilica which holds an opera of Bernini. Dedicated to San Lawrence
olisa Aghadiuno (20 months ago)
Beautiful place with a lot of culture very architecturally interesting
Hayley Amos (2 years ago)
amazing experience, I recommend San Lorenzo to every visitor in Rome. So beautiful and breath-taking.
Mario Galteri (2 years ago)
It's amazing to know that this building is over 2000 years old
Angelo DiPietro (2 years ago)
All the features of the Basilica were just beautiful. The artistry just masterful. The religious historical paintings and statues breathtaking. This was a place l would revisit.
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