National Historical Museum

Stockholm, Sweden

The National Historical Museum (Historiska muséet) covers Swedish cultural history and art from the Stone Age to the 16th century. The museum is known for its so called "Gold Room" (Guldrummet) by the architect Leif Blomberg, where a large number of gold objects are kept as part of the exhibition. The museum hosts also the largest Viking exhibition, with more than 4,000 original artifacts.

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Category: Museums in Sweden

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Priyanka Shinde (18 months ago)
The museum is very well designed. It has information in English too. The best thing is that it is for free.
Chuck Hill (18 months ago)
Excellent! Our entire family had a great time visiting. One could spend hours going through and studying everything or you go thru and see all the highlights in an hour or too. Def a good place to go when it's cold out!
Dave Hoekstra (2 years ago)
A great place to spend some time learning about Swedish history. Some of the facts are a bit dry, but there is something for everyone. And it is free!
Olga P (2 years ago)
Wonderful museum free of charge. Be preperated to spend 2 hours there... Its very interactive and it really makes you understand about the culture of Sweden
Katja Jacobs (2 years ago)
Free-entrance museum. Highly recommended for anyone interested in Sweden's background. Young lady at the museum shop desk was so friendly. There are free spacey lockers to leave your stuff during the visit. The service desk lady said I could do the whole museum in 1,5 - 2 hours. I only had 1,5 hours and chose to go straight to the Viking part. This is just a fraction of the whole museum but took me already 1,5 hours to see and read everything! It's a blessing this Museum is free for visitors, this way you can visit it several times and take enough time to see everything on a slower pace.
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