Temple of Minerva Medica

Rome, Italy

The erroneously named Temple of Minerva Medica is, in fact, a ruined nymphaeum of Imperial Rome, built in the 4th century. Nymphaeum is a building devoted to the nymphs and often connected to the water supply. The decagonal structure in opus latericium is relatively well preserved, the full dome having collapsed only in 1828. It is surrounded on three sides with other chambers added at a later date. There is no mention of it in ancient literature or inscriptions.

The structure represents a transition in Roman secular architecture between the octagonal dining room of the Domus Aurea and the dome of the Pantheon, in particular, and the architecture of nearby Byzantine churches. The diameter of the hall is about 24 metres, and the height was 33 — important from the structural point of view, especially for the ribs in the dome. In the interior are nine niches, besides the entrance; and above these are ten corresponding round-arched windows. Both the interior and exterior walls were once covered with marble.

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Details

Founded: 4th century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

yusril maulidan (2 months ago)
Very good chicken tandory. The other food is just so so.
Mirjana Prekovic (2 months ago)
Amazing historic site.
Rasp Berry (9 months ago)
The temple is inaccesible to public due to conservation efforts, it will be open later this year, the place is between railway and road with not much space around, like it barely survived not to be demolished in the way. Its a brick dome with side halfdomes temple, i imagine it close to later byzantine churches.
Michał Galas (14 months ago)
Few meters from my hotel spectacular ruins
Michael Cook (2 years ago)
Impressive remains especially showing the opus latericium brickwork. The site is still closed but you're able to a lot of the nymphaeum. The church os Santa Bibiana is close by but is also closed for restofri.
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