Basilica of San Vitale

Rome, Italy

The Basilica of Sts. Vitalis, Valeris, Gervase and Protase is commonly named Basilica di San Vitale. It was built in 400 with funds provided by Vestina, a wealthy dowager, and was consecrated by Pope Innocent I in 401/402. The dedication to St. Vitalis and his family (Saint Valeria, his wife, and Sts. Gervasius and Protasius, their sons) is dated to 412.

San Vitale was restored several times, the most important being the rebuilding by Pope Sixtus IV before the Jubilee of 1475, and then in 1598, 1938 and 1960. The church is currently located several metres under the level of the street (via Nazionale), that it faces.

The portico is the most ancient part of the church, possibly dating back to the 5th century. It was altered at the end of the 16th century. The inscription on the portico, with the arms of Pope Sixtus IV, dates from this time. Pope Pius IX built the staircase to the 5th century portico in 1859.

The church has a single nave, with walls frescoed with scenes of martyrdom, among which a Martyrdom of St Ignatius of Antioch, in which a ruined Colosseum is depicted. The apsis, original of the 5th century, is decorated with a fresco by Andrea Commodi, The Ascent to Calvary.

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Address

Via Nazionale 195, Rome, Italy
See all sites in Rome

Details

Founded: 400 AD
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

LouannaNEGUT Gmail (15 months ago)
Great positive surprising Holly Place. Worth a visit as well as during the mass.
Music Dj (20 months ago)
I had seen this building in a dream months before and on my first visit to Rome just randomly walking past couldn’t believe my eyes, there stood before me was the exact building that I had seen in a dream! I had to go inside and take a look, it was very peaceful and well kept, I lite a couple of candles and spent a few moments taking it all in. I have no idea as to the significance of the dream? But an experience I shall not forget.
Rosalie Mintoff (2 years ago)
Was there during the Holy week and they make us feel like home
bibin chacko (3 years ago)
Like it tired travelling will rested and cooled feel interior has good work better for praying atmosphere all most done
Nicky bonavia (3 years ago)
Very nice church never saw like it . Must visit.
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