Palazzo Farnese

Rome, Italy

Palazzo Farnese is one of the most important High Renaissance palaces in Rome. Owned by the Italian Republic, it was given to the French government in 1936 for a period of 99 years, and currently serves as the French embassy in Italy.

First designed in 1517 for the Farnese family, the building expanded in size and conception when Alessandro Farnese became Pope Paul III in 1534, to designs by Antonio da Sangallo the Younger. Its building history involved some of the most prominent Italian architects of the 16th century, including Michelangelo, Jacopo Barozzi da Vignola and Giacomo della Porta.

At the end of the 16th century, the important fresco cycle of The Loves of the Gods in the Farnese Gallery was carried out by the Bolognese painter Annibale Carracci, marking the beginning of two divergent trends in painting during the 17th century, the Roman High Baroque and Classicism. The famous Farnese sculpture collection, now in the National Archeological Museum of Naples, as well as other Farnese collections, now mostly in Capodimonte Museum in Naples, were accommodated in the palace.

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Details

Founded: 1514-1534
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Brett Judd (5 months ago)
It's a beautiful building, but it's not a destination place unless you have come to Campo de' Fiori. Nothing here but the building guarded by soldiers and two fountains.
Emil (6 months ago)
Fantastic place with fantastic art. There is certainly good reason behind the Hercules piece being as renowned as it is. Can recommend going for a stroll around the plaza as well, especially the monastery next door
Anna Ceccarelli (6 months ago)
The Palace is amazing. Sometimes it offers the possibility to be visited.
Licia Sisalli (7 months ago)
Even if heavily guarded it's still a beautiful site
Shiro LeHero (8 months ago)
The area is very nice, so many bars and restaurants to enjoy!
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