San Marcello al Corso

Rome, Italy

San Marcello al Corso was built before 418, when Pope Boniface I was elected there. Pope Adrian I, in the 8th century, built a church on the same place, which is currently under the modern church. On 22 May 1519, a fire destroyed the church. The money collected for its rebuilding was used to bribe the landsknechts, who were pillaging the city during the Sack of Rome (1527).

The work was continued by Antonio da Sangallo the Younger, who rebuilt the church, but a Tiber flood damaged it again in 1530. It was only in 1592–1597 that the church was completed with a facade by Carlo Fontana, commissioned by Monsignor Marcantonio Cataldi Boncompagni. The exterior travertine statues were sculpted by Francesco Cavallini, and the stucco bas-relief over the entrance, with depicts San Filippo Benizio, was created by Antonio Raggi.

Under the main altar, decorated with 12th century opus sectile, are the relics of several saints, which include those of Pope Marcellus as well as Digna and Emerita. The last chapel on the left is dedicated to St Philip Benizi. The late-Baroque decoration contains sculptures by Francesco Cavallini and reliefs by Ercole Ferrata and Antonio Raggi. The first chapel on the left has the double tomb of Cardinal Giovanni Michiel and his grandson Antonio Orso sculpted by Jacopo Sansovino.

The church is administered and owned by the Servite Order since 1369.

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Details

Founded: 4th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nikos Xynos (3 years ago)
One of the many amazing churches of Rome.
Carla Henrichs (3 years ago)
Wonderful and peace place. Need a ladder for a wheelchair
Peter Smith (4 years ago)
One of the many amazing churches of Rome worth a visit as always.
Richard Howlett (4 years ago)
This is a fantastic religeous building and well worth a visit. It is not an amusement arcade or a tourist attraction so all who have previously reviewed with less than 5 stars should be ashamed.
Charles Seaton Jr. (4 years ago)
It's a small Church but its beautiful is Large.
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