The convent and church of St. Clare was founded on the site in 1280s. It was to be one of the very first convents to be dissolved during the Swedish Reformation. Gustav Vasa had the church and convent torn down in 1527.

The new Lutheran church, built under the order of King John III in 1572, is a cruciform shaped. It has the second highest tower in Scandinavia, over one hundred metres high. The interior contains a fine altarpiece and pulpit, both made in the mid-18th century.

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Details

Founded: 1572
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Felipe Lima (2 years ago)
St Clara Church is extremely beautiful and serene both inside and outside. Situated in down town Stockholm just next to the Central Station, you'll feel it blends well with the modern surroundings. A five star church that I recommend to visit that amazing construction.
P Plazza (2 years ago)
A big and beautiful church in the centre of Stockholm. Love this place.
Jonny (2 years ago)
It is a really nice place
Rob Davis (2 years ago)
Very spectacular church in the heart of Stockholm. Nice place to go in and get warm in the winter. They have water and toilets in there too for free. Very nice artwork on the inside as well.
Kavitha Jeyakumar (2 years ago)
Famous church. u can visit with free entrance.
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