Fürstenburg Castle

Mals, Italy

Furstenburg Castle was erected in the 13th century on behalf of the Bishop Conrad of Chur (1272-1282). In the 16th and 17th centuries A.D. it was however restructured according to the style of the time. The oldest part of the castle is the tower which displays walls of a three meters thick diameter.

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Address

Clusio, Mals, Italy
See all sites in Mals

Details

Founded: 1272
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.suedtirol.info

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stefano Fanti (7 months ago)
Bad experience on August 31st. Although we had read on the site and called the same morning for confirmation, we arrive on site and the visit at 2 pm we discover is not expected. Like us, about 10 other people were on site. Tourist office absolutely inadequate in the info it provides.
Frank Schneider (2 years ago)
Not bad
Daniel Linter (2 years ago)
Beautiful castle, home to the students of the nearby school.
Daniel Linter (2 years ago)
Beautiful castle, home to the students of the nearby school.
CRISTIANA GOZZI (3 years ago)
Abbiamo visto e fotografato il Castello nel giorno del nostro arrivo a Burgusio ma non lo abbiamo visitato internamente in quanto è accessibile solo il mastio e rigorosamente con guida. Il Castello, sede della Scuola di Agraria, è molto suggestivo quando viene illuminato in orario serale!
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