Mühlbacher Klause Castle

Rio di Pusteria, Italy

Mühlbacher Klause (Chiusa di Rio Pusteria) castle was built by Sigmund, Duke of Tyrol, between 1458 and the 1480's. It replaced an older fort, built in the 13th century and which was situated about 600 meters west of the present location.

Both fortifications were built here to control the passage through the Pusteria valley which was the border between the counties of Gorizia and Tyrol. 

In the 18th century an administration wing, once annexed to the residential building, was destroyed by a flood. Around 1871 the northeastern tower was partly destroyed.

The most recent wartime involvement of the castle dates from the so-called French War at the beginning of the 19th century, when Napoleon's troops were faced by the Tyrolese militia.

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Details

Founded: 1458-1480
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.castles.nl

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ciccio Unico (20 months ago)
Castelli stupendo, piccolo angolo poco frequentato, impossibile non vederlo, merita una piccola visita. Coi negozi chiusi é ancora + bello.
Lohnunternehmen Mühlwieser (2 years ago)
Cool
Jess McConnell (2 years ago)
Very nice stop. Beautifully maintained. Was locked while we were there, so mainly hadca walk around view. Plenty of space to park.
Laura Manenti (2 years ago)
Just seen from the road.
Rusmir Hasic (3 years ago)
Ok
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