Trauttmansdorff Castle and Gardens

Meran, Italy

The origins of Trauttmansdorff Castle go all the way back to the Middle Ages. The structure was first documented in 1300 as Neuberg Castle. The medieval walls are still visible on the southwest side, and the crypt dates from that period. The fresco room has also been preserved from the Renaissance period.

In the mid-19th century, Count Joseph von Trauttmansdorff bought the dilapidated building and renovated it using neo-Gothic elements. Trauttmansdorff Castle is thus Tyrol’s earliest example of a neo-Gothic castle. The next owner, Baron Friedrich von Deuster raised the east wing of the castle one level by adding the grand Rococo Hall in 1899, significantly altering the shape of the castle. The castle, which had been neglected after the world wars, was renovated again between 2000 and 2003: the siding, chapel, crypt, Rococo Hall, and Empress Elisabeth’s second floor living quarters have all been restored to their former splendor.

The gardens were initially laid out circa 1850 by Count Trauttmansdorff during the castle's restoration. Empress Elisabeth of Austria was a frequent visitor to Meran and the gardens. A bronze bust in her memory was placed in the gardens after her assassination in Geneva in 1898.

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Details

Founded: 1899
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Bacher (21 months ago)
Whether a dietry ambition or indeed a full out culinary food romp with knobs on! Trauttmansdorff will serve it right with utter and doubtless delight! Get it down you and try it!
Sunil Shah (2 years ago)
A very well designed garden. Though it is a botanical garden, it is scenic too. It has a large variety of trees and plants. Details about them are mentioned at places. It involves lot of walking and climbing. Views from top are very good. You can have many photos with picturesque background for your sweet memories. I loved the place.
Anja Stenning (2 years ago)
Pretty gardens with nice landscape design. The views from the higher levels into the valley are amazing. The glasshouse with the insects is very interesting, too. Not many blossoms in September, but overall a nice experience and will easily keep you busy for four hours or so.
Marvin Steinm (2 years ago)
We had a wonderful day here. The park is big enough to spend all day long exploring it's gardens. Thanks to signs it is pretty clear which plants are to touch, smell or just to watch and there are a lot of them- from cactus to usual garden plants. The walkways are cleaned well and there are also attractions to have fun on your walk by or challenge your knowledge. All in all a great visit for both young and old
Kana Ristic (2 years ago)
Didn't know what to expect from a tourism museum but was certainly not disappointed! Very very entertaining and insightful. I would think anyone would enjoy it with plenty of art and interactive features. The gardens were also spectacular.
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