Trauttmansdorff Castle and Gardens

Meran, Italy

The origins of Trauttmansdorff Castle go all the way back to the Middle Ages. The structure was first documented in 1300 as Neuberg Castle. The medieval walls are still visible on the southwest side, and the crypt dates from that period. The fresco room has also been preserved from the Renaissance period.

In the mid-19th century, Count Joseph von Trauttmansdorff bought the dilapidated building and renovated it using neo-Gothic elements. Trauttmansdorff Castle is thus Tyrol’s earliest example of a neo-Gothic castle. The next owner, Baron Friedrich von Deuster raised the east wing of the castle one level by adding the grand Rococo Hall in 1899, significantly altering the shape of the castle. The castle, which had been neglected after the world wars, was renovated again between 2000 and 2003: the siding, chapel, crypt, Rococo Hall, and Empress Elisabeth’s second floor living quarters have all been restored to their former splendor.

The gardens were initially laid out circa 1850 by Count Trauttmansdorff during the castle's restoration. Empress Elisabeth of Austria was a frequent visitor to Meran and the gardens. A bronze bust in her memory was placed in the gardens after her assassination in Geneva in 1898.

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Details

Founded: 1899
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Brad Couper (2 months ago)
Amazing gardens, extremely well done. We spent about 4 hours there (including a lovely coffee break by the lake) and enjoyed every minute. Highly recommended to do!
Anja Svecarovski (3 months ago)
OK, how to review something that is so magnificent. If you, like me, love to visit each spot and take a LOT of photos, it will take you 7 hours, with lunch and coffee in the afternoon. But it is worth it, as you see many different plants and installations and you can see surrounding mountains from 2 high spots (it is safe, I'm afraid of heights and I managed to get there and back slowly). You only need to have a mask in some places with a bigger concentration of people, but it's mostly without. Take your time and enjoy your time there, take breaks and soak in the surrounding and you will feel relaxed in the end, even though you walked a lot :) Their map is amazingly easy to follow.
Sanne Hombroek (3 months ago)
Everything here is beautiful! The maintenance is impeccable, the waitress at the restaurant was extremely efficient and very friendly. The Touriseum inside is very cool as well, especially liked the giant 'pinball machine'. It can get very hot in summer.
Il corbello Di Pianoia (4 months ago)
The museum is decent. The gardens are quite interesting. If you live in countryside, don't bother to visit, it's not worth the price. If you're from a big city, it's a breath of fresh air so I suggest you to visit it.
Misa Stanojevic (4 months ago)
Beautiful botanical garden with also a beautiful castle. Beautiful flowers with amazing flowers and colourful. Big flipper made of wood. I reccomend this place to visit!!! There is also a restaurant in case you want to refresh. And you a few hours to see it all
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