Sant'Eusebio

Rome, Italy

Sant'Eusebio is a titular church devoted to Saint Eusebius of Rome, a 4th-century martyr. The church is first mentioned in 474, by an inscription in the catacombs of Saints Marcellino e Pietro. It was consecrated by Pope Gregory IX, after the restoration of 1238. The Romanesque style, dating back to this restoration, survived to the restorations of the 17th, 18th, and 20th centuries.

The interior is separated into a nave with two flanking aisles. The present design dates to 1600 work by Onorio Longhi, who restored the presbytery, main altar, and choir. The ceiling fresco is a neoclassical masterpiece of Anton Raphael Mengs depicting the Glory of Sant'Eusebio (1757). Other paintings in the church are attributed to Giuseppe Passeri (central nave window), Andreas Ruthart (choir), Baldassarre Croce (Jesus, Mary, and Saints near the main altar), Cesare Rossetti (Crucifix at the main altar facing choir), Pompeo Batoni (Madonna and Bambino near main altar) and Francesco Solimena.

The main altar has custody of the relics of St Eusebius of Rome, who is supposed to have commissioned and financed construction of the church in the 4th century. The church is supposedly built on the site of his house.

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Details

Founded: c. 470 AD
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lavinia Germani (15 months ago)
Very nice small church...
Martin V Mathew (17 months ago)
An old but beautiful church
alessandro pulcini (19 months ago)
Parrocchia all'Esquilino, storica e popolare. Un po malandata, ma amata dalla popolazione di Piazza Vittorio
Daniela Pirelli (19 months ago)
Bellissima. Un gioiello nascosto
Vasili Timonen (3 years ago)
he church is open, according to the Diocese: Weekdays: Mondays 7:30 to 9:00, 17:30 to 19:00; Tuesdays to Saturdays 8:00 to 12:00, 17:00 to 19:00 -BUT 18:00 to 19:30 only all week in August. Sundays and Solemnities 8:30 to 12:00, 17:30 to 19:30 (18:00 to 20:00 in August). This is an interesting 18th century former monastic church on older foundations, built by the Celestine Benedictines who are now extinct. Mass is celebrated: Weekdays, 7:30 (not August) and 18:30; Saturdays, 9:00 (not August) and 18:30; Sundays 9:00, 10:30 and 18:30. The evening Mass is at 19:00 in June, July and August. There is Eucharistic adoration on Fridays, and the Blessed Sacrament is exposed from 17:00 until 18:30 except for First Fridays when it is from 9:00 (that is, all day). On the feast-day of St Anthony the Great of Egypt, 17 January, there is a blessing of animals in the piazza. This is an old tradition, and used to be performed in front of the church of "Sant'Antonio Abate all'Esquilino" until motor traffic made it dangerous in the 20th century. It used to be the case that farm animals were brought along, in the days when much of the land inside the city walls was still open farmland, and up to fairly recently horses were much in evidence. Nowadays it only concerns pets, especially horrible little dogs that look like rats in platform shoes ("lupe di Roma moderna", as the locals would say, the "wolves of modern Rome").
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