Santa Bibiana

Rome, Italy

Santa Bibiana is a small Baroque style church. The church façade was designed and built by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, who also produced a sculpture of the saint holding the palm leaf of martyrs.

According to an ancient, not documented tradition, the church was built in 363 by Roman matron Olimpina on the house where, during the supposed persecution of emperor Julian (361-363), Bibiana, her mother Dafrosa and her sister Demetria would have suffered martyrdom.

On the other hand, according to the Liber Pontificalis the church was erected in 467 under the pontificate of Pope Simplicius. Pope Leo II (682-683) moved there the relics of Martyrs Simplicius, Faustina and Viatrix from the Generosa Catacombs. The same Pope built in the surroundings (iuxta Sanctam Vivianam) a church consecrated to Saint Paul, no longer extant. The church was restored by Pope Honorius III in 1224.

The present facade was designed and built by then 26-year-old Gian Lorenzo Bernini in 1624-1626, as commissioned by Pope Urban VIII. The columns lining the nave are from the original 5th-century church.

The bodies of St Bibiana (Viviana or Vibiana), her mother Dafrosa and her sister Demetria were discovered inside a 3rd-century sarcophagus, and now rest inside an alabaster urn under the major altar. The column just inside the church is said to be the one Bibiana was strapped to.

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Details

Founded: 467 AD
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

POLO STAR BD (2 months ago)
Nicr
Karan Paudel (5 months ago)
Nice
Rio Jer (15 months ago)
Nice painting
Al Amin Mohammad (16 months ago)
Very nice view
Claire Wood (2 years ago)
This tiny little church is in the oddest place, at the back of Termini station, between a tram line and an underpass. It was open when I went there at 11am, there was no timetable to suggest regular opening hours, but they seemed to be preparing for mass. I had the place to myself, to enjoy the art, including Bernini's statue of Santa Bibiana. It's not easy to take photos in the small space, but overall well worth the detour.
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