St. Luke's Church

Kotor, Montenegro

St. Luke's Church was built by Mauro Kacafrangi in 1195 of which is mentioned in the inscription on the western façade. This is a modest one-nave church whose main nave is longitudinally divided into three parts. St. Luka’s church has characteristics of the Romanesque and Byzantine architecture. This is the only building in the town which did not suffer any major damage during earthquakes. It was depicted with frescoes soon after its construction, of which remained only some fragments on the southern wall.

The church altar was the work of Dascal Dimitrije, the founder of the Rafailovic school of painting from the seventeenth century. Once this church was catholic, but later it was given to orthodox people to use. Thus the church has two altars – the catholic and orthodox. The church floor is made of tombstones of common tombs of Kotor citizens, as burials took place in the very church until 1930s.

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Address

Ulica 1, Kotor, Montenegro
See all sites in Kotor

Details

Founded: 1195
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

More Information

www.tokotor.me

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Goran Stojkovski (2 years ago)
Extraordinary place to visit in the area. Among the other Romanesque monuments of our town, this charming church really deserves a special place. Being constructed in 1195 it is one of the few of such age that is still standing and even more it is still in use. Locals believe that it is miraculous since it has remained standing through earthquakes and wars. It did suffer some damage but it looks now almost the same as it did more than 820 years ago. What makes this church a reflection of local life style is the fact that for two centuries it had two altars, where both Roman Catholics and Christian orthodox believers could pray together.
Paul Graves (2 years ago)
Very cool church dating from 1195.
Kenneth Koh (2 years ago)
Interesting church will have 2 chapels inside - one for catholic and the other for Greek orthodox. Demonstrating the peaceful coexistence between the 2 religion in this town. The Guide shared the residents had bigger issues, such as against a common enemy Ottomans during its days to fight over their religion
Android Setup (2 years ago)
Orthodox Church in the Old Town.
Montenegro Tour guide (3 years ago)
Beautiful little historical orthodox church from 12 century ..one of the few witnesses of the life in old Kotor
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