San Giovanni Castle

Kotor, Montenegro

San Giovanni, also called St. John’s Castle, is perched 1200m high on the hill of St. John. The fortifications date back as far as 532 when Byzantine Emperor Justinian I had the fort built. Since it’s creation, the fort has under seen plenty of changes and battles under Venetian, Russian, and French rule. It’s been bombed by British Naval armies, occupied during World War II, and even survived three separate earthquakes.

The walking path to San Giovanni castle has 1,350 steps and needs good shoes. The view over the Kotor bay is breathtaking from the top.

San Giovanni is part of the fortifications of Kotor which are an integrated historical fortification system that protected the medieval town of Kotor containing ramparts, towers, citadels, gates, bastions, forts, cisterns, a castle, and ancillary buildings and structures. They incorporate military architecture of Illyria, Byzantium, Venice, and Austria. Together with the old town and its natural surroundings the fortifications were inscribed in the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 1979 labelled Natural and Culturo-Historical Region of Kotor.

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Details

Founded: 532 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Montenegro

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

James Ozzie Osborne (18 months ago)
A worthwhile climb in beautiful Kotar! Bring your walking shoes, it's a strenuous enough hike. Take plenty of water also. You'll want to stop at many points on the way up, the scenery is amazing, with the turkquoise clear waters between stunning mountains. Go early when it's not too crowded
Yasin Badir (19 months ago)
You can access this castle from old town and also from trekking road which is outside the old town. Old town entrance is 8 euros (very expensive, because it was 3 euros before). The view is amazing. Before sunset. It was like someone had stopped the time while the wind was licking our face by the smell of the sea. Our whole body were painted in peace.
Kaido Jõesaar (20 months ago)
Go before sunrise, you'll beat the masses and don't have to pay the entrance fee. I saw people with flip-flops but because it's poorly maintained I would recommend sturdy shoes. Also there are no porta potties, so you know...
Mehmet Özkara (2 years ago)
A spectacular view from 1200 metres and 1350 steps as the rumour runs. But the hill’s height is probably around 500 metres. Prepare your bag before climbing up with towels, water and maybe some snacks. And your power bank
jacop led (2 years ago)
I loved my very early hiking tour. I loved my afternoon hiking tour. I loved the people of that very small but cute and charming town. I love the friends I made there during my stay.
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