The Monastery of Ostrog is a monastery of the Serbian Orthodox Church sitatued against an almost vertical background, high up in the large rock of Ostroška Greda. It is dedicated to Saint Basil of Ostrog, who was buried here. Ostrog monastery is the most popular pilgrimage place in Montenegro.

The Monastery was founded by Vasilije, the Metropolitan Bishop of Herzegovina in the 17th century. He died there in 1671 and some years later he was glorified. His body is enshrined in a reliquary kept in the cave-church dedicated to the Presentation of the Mother of God to the Temple.

The present-day look was given to the Monastery in 1923-1926, after a fire which had destroyed the major part of the complex. Fortunately, the two little cave-churches were spared and they are the key areas of the monument. The frescoes in the Church of the Presentation were created towards the end of the 17th century. The other church, dedicated to the Holy Cross, is placed within a cave on the upper level of the monastery and was painted by master Radul, who successfully coped with the natural shapes of the cave and laid the frescoes immediately on the surface of the rock and the south wall. Around the church are the monastic residences, which together with the church building and the scenery make this monument outstandingly beautiful.

The Orthodox monastery of Ostrog is one of the most frequently visited on the Balkans. It attracts over 100,000 visitors a year. It is visited by believers from all parts of the world, either individually or in groups. It represents the meeting place of all confessions: the Orthodox, the Catholics and the Muslims. According to the stories of pilgrims, by praying by his body, many have been cured and helped in lessening the difficulties in their lives.

The upper monastery houses the Church of the Presentation and the Church of the Holy Cross. Saint Basil of Ostrog's relics lie in the Church of the Presentation. Also of interest is the vine which grows out of the rock. It's said that it's a miracle because nothing should be able to grow out of the sheer rock face.

The lower monastery centers around the Church of the Holy Trinity that was built in 1824. It also makes up most of the monk residences. There are dorm rooms available for pilgrims here too.

It is traditional for pilgrims to walk the 3km from the lower monastery to the upper monastery barefoot.

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Founded: 1671
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Macedonian Cuisine (19 months ago)
Amazing religious place. Monastery of St.Vasilij Ostroski, Serbian saint.
Rosanna Martin-Ruiz (19 months ago)
Beautiful monastery perched on a Rock. Nice mosaics. Worth a visit
Stanislav Kamaletdinov (19 months ago)
Amazing monastery high in mountains. True sacral place with very special atmosphere
Serhat Parlak (20 months ago)
Road is little bit scary but when u reach here u feel close to god ur self
G L Littleton (21 months ago)
It was a long drive from where I was staying. It's very crowded but was well worth the visit. It's amazing the workmanship to built this type of structure. It's a must see if you visit anywhere near it.
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