The Monastery of Ostrog is a monastery of the Serbian Orthodox Church sitatued against an almost vertical background, high up in the large rock of Ostroška Greda. It is dedicated to Saint Basil of Ostrog, who was buried here. Ostrog monastery is the most popular pilgrimage place in Montenegro.

The Monastery was founded by Vasilije, the Metropolitan Bishop of Herzegovina in the 17th century. He died there in 1671 and some years later he was glorified. His body is enshrined in a reliquary kept in the cave-church dedicated to the Presentation of the Mother of God to the Temple.

The present-day look was given to the Monastery in 1923-1926, after a fire which had destroyed the major part of the complex. Fortunately, the two little cave-churches were spared and they are the key areas of the monument. The frescoes in the Church of the Presentation were created towards the end of the 17th century. The other church, dedicated to the Holy Cross, is placed within a cave on the upper level of the monastery and was painted by master Radul, who successfully coped with the natural shapes of the cave and laid the frescoes immediately on the surface of the rock and the south wall. Around the church are the monastic residences, which together with the church building and the scenery make this monument outstandingly beautiful.

The Orthodox monastery of Ostrog is one of the most frequently visited on the Balkans. It attracts over 100,000 visitors a year. It is visited by believers from all parts of the world, either individually or in groups. It represents the meeting place of all confessions: the Orthodox, the Catholics and the Muslims. According to the stories of pilgrims, by praying by his body, many have been cured and helped in lessening the difficulties in their lives.

The upper monastery houses the Church of the Presentation and the Church of the Holy Cross. Saint Basil of Ostrog's relics lie in the Church of the Presentation. Also of interest is the vine which grows out of the rock. It's said that it's a miracle because nothing should be able to grow out of the sheer rock face.

The lower monastery centers around the Church of the Holy Trinity that was built in 1824. It also makes up most of the monk residences. There are dorm rooms available for pilgrims here too.

It is traditional for pilgrims to walk the 3km from the lower monastery to the upper monastery barefoot.

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Founded: 1671
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mailin Columbie (15 months ago)
This is a great place that if you are in Montenegro must visit. It’s a place where faithful and people from around the world go to find help or to contemplate the panorama. My time there was great. Monks are very helpful and kind.
Vladimir Pozniak (15 months ago)
Beautiful getaway for 1 day out of the coast.
ido ferber (15 months ago)
I have seen already quite a few churches in my life, ostrog monastery is special for the fresco paintings bit most of all it's unique placing. Just the climb there was already something by its own. The steep walls and the difficulty of building something in such a special place is really interesting to me. I have to say though that all the shops downstairs and the marketing if the place I did not like so much. Takes a lot of value from the place in my eyes.
Jacob Fuest (17 months ago)
Certainly worth a visit on a trip through Montenegro. Beautiful place! Make sure to hike up the stairs inside the monastery for stunning views. We took the “small” road up, no problem at all.
Toby Shaw (20 months ago)
Amazing structure. Incredibly beautiful. Road is fairly okay going up providing you have experience on small roads. Wouldn’t say there was absolutely loads to do at the monastery. However, we spent a good 30 minutes here walking around and taking in the views. Parking is right at the top with overflow further down. No photography allowed inside the monastery. Although it is free to enter.
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