Rezevici Monastery

Budva, Montenegro

Reževići Monastery is a medieval Serbian Orthodox monastery located in Katun Reževići village between Budva and Petrovac. The monastery has two churches.

According to another legend, Stefan the First-Crowned, the first king of Serbia, drank wine from this wine vessel during his visit to his cousin, Venetian Doge Dandolo. Later, in 1223 or 1226, he allegedly built 'The Church of the Dormition of the Mother of God' near the guesthouse.

In 1351, a church dedicated to Saint Stephen was built next to The Church of the Dormition of the Mother of God аgainst the order issued by Stephen Uroš IV Dušan of Serbia during his trip from Dubrovnik to Skadar. The column with wine vessel (kept full by the population of surrounding villages to show their hospitality) survived until the mid-19th century.

The monastery was a gathering place for the members of the Paštrovići tribe who traditionally held meetings there to make important decisions or to elect their chieftain. The last chieftain elected by the Paštrovići assembly held at this monastery was Stefan Štiljanović. Both churches and guesthouse were deserted for some time after they had been plundered and razed by the pirates of Ulcinj in the mid 15th century. In 1785, the monastery, its library and treasury were plundered by Mahmud Pasha Bushatli.

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Address

E65, Budva, Montenegro
See all sites in Budva

Details

Founded: 1223-1226
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sonja Rodić (2 years ago)
Very charming. Worth visiting.
Julie BARRON (2 years ago)
Beautiful place.
Jovana Marković (2 years ago)
No metter if you are religious or not, you' ll find peace and shadow inside.
Віктор Музика (2 years ago)
Nice place to see
Paddie Breeze (2 years ago)
Beautifully restored murals inside this little church/ monastery.
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