Miholjska Prevlaka Monastery

Tivat, Montenegro

Miholjska prevlaka, also known as 'Island of Flowers', includes a monastery dedicated to Archangel Michael. It was founded by Serbian Archbishop Sava (s. 1219–35). The church base was built earlier, reconstructed in the 9th century and destroyed in the 11th century. The monastery was the seat of the Eparchy of Zeta between the 13th and 15th centuries.

Under planned restoration, the monastery was destroyed by the Republic of Venice in 1441 after it was proclaimed unsafe due to the rumors of a plague breakout. Recent research by the Military Medical Academy in Belgrade, using recovered remains of monks from that time have revealed that the monks died probably due to arsenic poisoning. There are remains of the church base.

Miholjska prevlaka was a tourist resort for Yugoslav military personnel, closed for general public in the Socialist Yugoslavia period.

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Address

Tivat, Montenegro
See all sites in Tivat

Details

Founded: c. 1230
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Valentina Kulanova (2 years ago)
Очень красивый остров, но пляжа как такового нет. Грязно. Монастырь красивый интересная история.
Dmytro Doc. (2 years ago)
It's ok
Lea Kujundzic (3 years ago)
This is holy place.
Emília Kornél (5 years ago)
Beautiful,sacred place with nice, warmheart people. But my advise is: Don't visit them without any invitation or without any important reason-- They have a strict schedule, you know. God bless you
Dance Montenegro (7 years ago)
Beautiful Orthodox Christian monastery.
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