Miholjska Prevlaka Monastery

Tivat, Montenegro

Miholjska prevlaka, also known as 'Island of Flowers', includes a monastery dedicated to Archangel Michael. It was founded by Serbian Archbishop Sava (s. 1219–35). The church base was built earlier, reconstructed in the 9th century and destroyed in the 11th century. The monastery was the seat of the Eparchy of Zeta between the 13th and 15th centuries.

Under planned restoration, the monastery was destroyed by the Republic of Venice in 1441 after it was proclaimed unsafe due to the rumors of a plague breakout. Recent research by the Military Medical Academy in Belgrade, using recovered remains of monks from that time have revealed that the monks died probably due to arsenic poisoning. There are remains of the church base.

Miholjska prevlaka was a tourist resort for Yugoslav military personnel, closed for general public in the Socialist Yugoslavia period.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Tivat, Montenegro
See all sites in Tivat

Details

Founded: c. 1230
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Valentina Kulanova (2 years ago)
Очень красивый остров, но пляжа как такового нет. Грязно. Монастырь красивый интересная история.
Dmytro Doc. (2 years ago)
It's ok
Lea Kujundzic (3 years ago)
This is holy place.
Emília Kornél (5 years ago)
Beautiful,sacred place with nice, warmheart people. But my advise is: Don't visit them without any invitation or without any important reason-- They have a strict schedule, you know. God bless you
Dance Montenegro (7 years ago)
Beautiful Orthodox Christian monastery.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.