Maria Magdalena Church

Stockholm, Sweden

The history of Maria Magdalena Church dates back to the 1350s when King Magnus Eriksson with the permission of Pope Clement VI had a funeral chapel built on the location and dedicated it to Mary Magdalene. When Gustav Vasa liberated Stockholm in the early 1520s, his troops led by Peder Fredag encamped in the chapel and suffered severe losses when the troops of Christian II of Denmark attacked from the city. This might have been one of the reasons Vasa had all churches, monasteries, and chapels on the ridges surrounding the city destroyed after the introduction of Protestantism in 1527, including the chapel of Mary Magdalene. However, his son King John III started the construction of a new church on the location in 1588. His death in 1592 caused construction work to halt, and the church remained uncompleted until 1634.

Both Nicodemus Tessin the Elder and the Younger gave the church its Baroque appearance. The spire of the former, however, inaugurated in 1676 and according to himself the most beautiful spire in Stockholm, was destroyed in a fire in 1759 together with some 300 buildings in the neighbourhood. Superintendent Carl Johan Cronstedt was commissioned to rebuild the church and had his task completed in 1763. An interior restoration was made in 1927 and the exterior yellow colour was ameliorated in 1986.

The church has a nave but no aisles. The painting of the high altar is the Adoration of the Shepherds by Louis Masreliez from around 1800. The pulpit, the Baroque design of Carl Johan Cronstedt, was inaugurated in 1763 and carries a medallion with the portrait of Mary Magdalene. The front of the organ was designed by Carl Fredrik Adelcrantz in 1774 while the present 50-stop organ is from 1927. A second organ was added in 1986 and in the choir is a third smaller organ.

The baptismal font dates back to 1638 and among the sacramental vessels which survived the fire in 1759, is the oldest effects of the church - a sacramental pan in copper with capital inscriptions. Among the epitaphs in the church are one dedicate to Christopher Polhem and another to Carl Michael Bellman. Under the church are older sepulchral chambers, the burial chapel of which today serves parishes of the Estonian-Finnish Orthodox Church and the Russian Orthodox Church.

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Details

Founded: 1588-1634
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jingeon An-Lacroix (3 months ago)
Went in while the organ was playing. I don't know he/she was practicing or performing but it was absolutely beautiful.
Sançar Kurutluoğlu (4 months ago)
Quite and peaceful place in the middle of the action area.
Ted Moleff (5 months ago)
We enjoyed the visit.
mauricio corbalan (6 months ago)
An astonishing place. Read its history cause this church was once in the frontline of a battle in the XVII century and was burnt down during a defence of the city. When I attended a mass there, the priest was a peaceful and beautiful woman that was really taking care of the last Lutherans of the neighbourhood.
Gai Mordib (8 months ago)
Miracle photos seen all over the world. The photos are real what prompted the photos I save lives when I was a young boy. The Jesus and Moses photo was shot on November 23, 2018 The God photos were shot on October 7, 2020 you might have to zoom in and brighten up your screen a little bit on some of the photos. Please share it. God bless Thanks Gai. P.S There’s a gold cherub in front of the Sun, and giant pyramid shaped clouds and more enjoy.
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