Santa Maria Antiqua

Rome, Italy

Located at the foot of the Palatine Hill, Santa Maria Antiqua is the oldest and most significant Christian monument in the Roman Forum. The church was abandoned in the 9th century after an earthquake buried the buildings; it remained sealed for over 1000 years until its rediscovery in the early 20th century. Therefore, Santa Maria Antiqua represents a key element for the understanding of the cultural and urban development of the Roman Forum from Antiquity into the first centuries of the Christian period. Following a conservation program, the church is now open for tours.

The church contains a unique collection of wall paintings from the 6th to late 8th century. The discovery of these paintings have given many theories on the development of early medieval art and given distinctive beliefs in archaeology. The church has the earliest Roman depiction of Santa Maria Regina, the Virgin Mary as a Queen, from the 6th century.

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Details

Founded: 5th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ivo Hermsen (4 months ago)
Voor mij een van de mooiste dingen die te zien zijn op het forum. Een van de oudste kerken in Rome die dankzij een aardbeving nog redelijk bewaard is gebleven. Met lichttechnieken worden oude fresco’s tot leven geroepen. Alleen al de gang ernaartoe is de moeite waard. Zorg dat je een super ticket hebt voor de toegang. Jammer dat anderen een slechte beoordeling geven omdat het gesloten was, dit doet dit schitterende monument te kort.
Giulia Pellegrini (4 months ago)
Bellissima esperienza, ben spiegata coi suoi 7 strati decorativi succedutisi nel tempo. Da non perdere, grazie al biglietto S.U.P.E.R.!
Carmine DpC (8 months ago)
La Basilica di Santa Maria Antiqua da poco più di due anni ha riaperto al pubblico i suoi splendori dopo oltre trent’anni. La spettacolare basilica, scoperta da Giacomo Boni nel 1900 alle pendici del Palatino, ha nelle pitture che rivestono le sue pareti uno stupendo esempio unico nel mondo cristiano del primo millennio. Pitture perfettamente restaurate e databili tra il VI e IX secolo dopo Cristo, IX secolo che coincide con il suo abbandono a seguito dei crolli causati dal terremoto dell’847. Luogo assolutamente da vedere ed ammirare.
Mariamaddalena Blandini (8 months ago)
Domenica 4 novembre, prima domenica del mese musei gratuiti, ponte dei morti.... ed è chiusa. Meno male che si era tanto sbandierato la riapertura dopo 30 anni. Se volete vederla informatevi prima su date di apertura. Dispiace per a una struttura così importante.
Patrizia Colangeli (8 months ago)
Roma Fori Imperiali. Chiesa cattolica che custodisce un ritratto di Maria con bambinello catalogati tra i più antichi. La chiesa fu costruita sopra un tempio pagano.
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